Sustainability Courses at the University of Iowa

Departments

 

Courses (* indicates the home department)

African American Studies

Course Name Number Prerequisites Professor Description
First-Year Seminar: Black New Orleans: Before and After Hurricane Katrina 129:029 None Richard Turner See ISIS
History and Environment in Africa

129:132;

also

16W:122*

None James L Giblin See ISIS
Crossing Borders Seminar

129:231;

also

008:231, 01H:247, 013:262, 016:247, 030:242, 035:273, 044:286*, 048:247, 113:247, 160:247, 181:247

None Rudolf Colloredo-Mansfeld, H G Penny, Rex D Honey See ISIS

 

American Indian and Native Studies

Course Name Number Prerequisites Professor Description
American Indian Environmentalism

149:076;

also

032:076*

None Michelene Pesantubbee See ISIS

 

American Studies

Course Name Number Prerequisites Professor Description
American Disasters 045:147 None Nicholas Yablon See ISIS
Seminar: Topics in American Studies: The Culture of Nature 045:250 None Laura Rigal See ISIS

 

Anthropology

Course Name Number Prerequisites Professor Description
Anthropology & Contemporary World Problems 113:010 None  Sonia Ryang, Elizabeth A. Newbury, Glenn R Storey See ISIS
Native Peoples of North America 113:110   Michael Chibnik  
Human Impacts on the Environment 113:113 None Matthew E Hill See ISIS
Environmentalism Cross-Culturally 113:114 None Scott R Schnell See ISIS
Animals Culture and Food 113:126 None Matthew E Hill See ISIS
Religion and Environmental Ethics

113:139*;

also

032:130, 033:139

junior or senior standing

or consent of instructor

Scott R Schnell See ISIS
Environment and Culture 113:143

113:003

or 113:010

or graduate standing

or consent of instructor

Scott R Schnell, Michael Chibnik

See ISIS
Foodways and Cuisine in the Past 113:157 None Margaret E Beck See ISIS
Pleistocene Peopling of the Americas 113:179 None Matthew E Hill See ISIS
Approaches to Geoarchaeology

113:189;

also

012:185*

012:136 or 012:172 or 113:161 or 113:164 or consent of
instructor
Elmer A Bettis III See ISIS
Seminar:  Ecological Anthropology 113:215 None Michael S Chibnik See ISIS
Crossing Borders Seminar

113:247;

also

008:231, 01H:247, 013:262, 016:247, 030:242, 035:273, 044:286*, 048:247, 129:231, 160:247, 181:247

None Rudolf Colloredo-Mansfeld, H G Penny, Rex D Honey See ISIS
Crossing Borders Pro-Seminar

113:248;

also

01H:330, 013:260, 016:244, 030:243, 035:271, 044:287*, 048:244

None Rex D Honey No detailed description is provided.
Development Policy and Planning in the Third World

113:275;

also

07B:275, 034:275, 042:275, 044:275*, 102:275,

None Douglas K Midgett Development policies and planning in Third World countries; important development problems and alternative perspectives on problems and proposed solutions; interdisciplinary seminar.
Primate Conservation Biology 213:152 113:013 or consent of instructor Nelson Ting No detailed description is provided.

 

 

Art and Art History

Course Name Number Prerequisites Professor Description
Problems in Design II Form & Function 01D:022 None Monica C D G Correia, Won Jae Lee No detailed description is provided.
Environmental Design I

01D:137*;

also

049:158

01A:003, 01A:004 or consent of instructor Monica C D G Correia No detailed description is provided.
Advanced Problems in Design 01D:249 graduate design major and consent of instructor Monica C D G Correia, Kelly J Clarke Special issues and topics in design.
Crossing Borders Seminar

01H:247;

also

008:231, 013:262, 016:247, 030:242, 035:273, 044:286*, 048:247, 113:247, 129:231, 160:247, 181:247

None Rudolf Colloredo-Mansfeld, H G Penny, Rex D Honey See ISIS
Crossing Borders Pro-Seminar

01H:330;

also

013:260, 016:244, 030:243, 035:271, 044:287*, 048:244, 113:248

None Rex D Honey No detailed description is provided.

 

 

Biology

Course Name Number Prerequisites Professor Description
First-Year Seminar:  The Biology of Biofuels 002:029   No Instructor Listed No detailed description is provided.
First-Year Seminar:  The Potential Impact of Nanomaterials on the Environment and Human Health 002:029 None Chi-Lien Cheng See ISIS
Spring Flora 002:087 None Kenneth G Jensen Recognition and identification of spring-flowering herbaceous plants, native woodland trees and shrubs, woody landscape plants, family characteristics, use of taxonomic key. See ISIS
Plants and Human Affairs 002:095 Students who are not in the University Honors Program must obtain special permission to register for honors courses/ sections. Course instructors may grant this permission after the first class meeting if seats are available. Diana G Horton See ISIS
Plant Diversity and Evolution 002:100 002:001, or 002:010 and 002:011, or equivalents Jeffry T Schabilion Major groups, including algae, bryophytes, ferns and fern allies, gymnosperms, primitive anglosperms; emphasis on evolutionary implications of structure, reproductive biology, ecological adaptations; extant representatives of each plant group, reference to paleobotanical evidence. See ISIS
Biogeography

002:103*;

also

044:103

002:001, or 002:010 and 002:011, or 044:003, or consent of instructor

George P Malanson;

Diana Horton

Biogeography is the study of the distribution of organisms across the earth. We will look at three questions: Why are organisms and groups of organisms where they are?; What does location mean for them?; and Why do the numbers of species vary from place to place? The basis of biogeography is evolution and ecology; evolutionary relations determine the potential mix of species in an area, ecological relations determine where species can live, and the two together determine where species are actually found and in what balance. In this course we will examine the environmental, spatial, and historical controls on the distribution of species, what forms those distributions take, and what methodologies are used for studies in biogeography. The diversity of species will be a special topic. The role of humans in modifying the biogeography of other species and the potential application of biogeographic knowledge in land use and conservation will be studied (in addition to the biogeography of Homo sapiens!). We will look at what kinds of evidence are brought to bear on the key questions. See ISIS
Vertebrate Zoology 002:108 002:010 and 002:011, or consent of instructor Vera J Fitzgerald See ISIS
Ecological Plant Anatomy 002:113 002:001, or 002:010 and 002:011, or equivalents Diana G Horton Fundamental tissue systems of vascular plants, emphasis on seed plants; development, differentiation of each cell type, arrangement in primary and secondary plant body; focus on relationships between structure, function.  See ISIS
Ecology

002:134*;

also

159:134

002:010;

002:011;

and 22M:016 or 22M:021, 22M:025, or 22M:035

Stephen D Hendrix See ISIS
Systematics: Classifying Biodiversity 002:140 002:001, or 002:010 and 002:011, or equivalents Diana G Horton Nature of species, isolating mechanisms, hybridization; problems of convergence, homology, plant mating systems; types of information used in making taxonomic decisions. See ISIS
Field Ecology 002:148 002:134 or consent of instructor; basic statistics recommended Jeff E Klahn Correlation of vegetation, environmental factors; delineation of plant communities, populations; population dynamics, analysis of field data; methods for describing ecological phenomena in quantitative terms; statistics. See ISIS

 

Biomedical Engineering

Course Name Number Prerequisites Professor Description
Design for Manufacturing

051:062;

also

056:032*;

058:032

Co-requisite:  057:015 Geb W Thomas See ISIS

 

Chemical and Biochemical Engineering

Course Name Number Prerequisites Professor Description
Energy and Society 052:030 None Alec B Scranton, David W Murhammer See ISIS
Sustainable Systems

052:107;

also

053:107*

None Jerald L Schnoor See ISIS
Environmental Chemistry I

052:231;

also

053:152*

004:012 Richard L Valentine See ISIS
Air Pollution and Control Technology

052:235;

also

053:159*

053:050

or consent of instructor

Patrick T O'Shaughnessy See ISIS
Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics

052:236*;

also

053:161

052:105 Charles O Stanier See ISIS
Green Chemical Engineering 052:237 None Charles O Stanier See ISIS

 

Chemistry

Course Name Number Prerequisites Professor Description
Atmospheric and Environmental Chemistry 004:173 Pre or co-requisite: 004:131 or 004:132 Mark A Young See ISIS
Organometallic Chemistry 004:203 004:170 Louis Messerle Emphasis on organometallic compounds of transition metal elements. This course has a substantial component on catalysis of industrially important chemical reactions, all of which save energy and allow use of less environmentally detrimentable reactants.
Electrochemistry 004:207 None Johna Leddy No detailed description is provided.

 

Cinema and Comparative Literature

Course Name Number Prerequisites Professor Description
Literature and Society:  Capturing Animals

048:179;

also

008:179*

None Teresa L Mangum See ISIS
Crossing Borders Pro-Seminar

048:244;

also

01H:330, 013:260, 016:244, 030:243, 035:271, 044:287*, 113:248

None Rex D Honey No detailed description is provided.
Crossing Borders Seminar

048:247;

also

008:231, 01H:247, 013:262, 016:247, 030:242, 035:273, 044:286*, 113:247, 129:231, 160:247, 181:247

None Rudolf Colloredo-Mansfeld, H G Penny, Rex D Honey See ISIS
Seminar Medieval Literature and Culture

048:402;

also

008:402*

None Claire Sponsler See ISIS

 

Civil and Environmental Engineering

Course Name Number Prerequisites Professor Description
Natural Environmental Systems

053:050

004:011 Gene F Parkin See ISIS
Principles of Environmental Engineering

053:055*;

also

152:162

053:050

or consent of instructor

Gene F Parkin See ISIS
Principles of Hydraulics and Hydrology 053:071 057:020 Serban G Constantinescu See ISIS
Groundwater 053:102 None Jerald L Schnoor See ISIS
Water Quality 053:103 None Jerald L Schnoor Sources, availability, uses, characteristics, criteria, best management practices for surface waters; protection of waters impaired by eutrophication, soil erosion and sedimentation; pathogenic organisms, habitat destruction, wastewater discharges, contaminated sediments, atmospheric deposition, watershed development, invasive species, irrigation return flows, stormwater discharges, nonpoint sources, agricultural runoff; laboratory component, measurement of water quality characteristics in the field.
Groundwater Modeling

053:104;

also

012:184*

012:166 or 053:103, or equivalent, or consent of instructor You-Kuan Zhang See ISIS
Engineering Geology

053:105*;

also

012:179

sophomore standing Michelle M Scherer Basic concepts in geology focusing on rock and soil, including material properties, spatial variability in properties, geological processes, external factors such as stress, evaluation of engineering design adequacy; site investigation and characterization techniques used to define and characterize geotechnical and hydrological properties of geological materials; case studies to illustrate the importance of geology on engineering designs. See ISIS
Sustainable Systems

053:107*;

also

052:107

None Jerald L Schnoor See ISIS
Fluvial Geomorphology

053:128;

also

012:138*

None Frank H Weirich See ISIS
Design for the Developing World 053:141 None Craig L Just See ISIS
Environmental Chemistry I

053:152*;

also

052:231

004:012 Richard L Valentine See ISIS
Environmental Chemistry Laboratory 053:153

004:012;

Co-requisite: 053:152

Richard L Valentine See ISIS
Environmental Microbiology 053:154

Co-requisite: 053:152

Timothy E Mattes See ISIS
Physical-Chemcial Process Fundamentals 053:156 053:050, 053:152, and 053:154 Richard L Valentine See ISIS
Environmental Engineering Design 053:157 053:050, 053:055, and 053:071 Gene F Parkin See ISIS
Solid and Hazardous Wastes

053:158;

also

175:198*

053:050 Michelle M Scherer See ISIS
Air Pollution and Control Technology

053:159*;

also

052:235

053:050

or consent of instructor

Patrick T O'Shaughnessy See ISIS
Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics

053:161;

also

052:236*

052:105 Charles O Stanier See ISIS
Civil Infrastructure 053:168 None Hosin Lee Analytical methods for developing Infrastructure Management Systems (IMS); evaluation of infrastructure condition, performance modeling, rehabilitation optimization, development of the IMS; basic concepts of information technology applied in solving civil infrastructure management problems.
Alluvial Channel Hydraulics 053:173 None Athanasios N Papanicolaou Laws governing fall velocity, applications to particle-size analysis; incipient motion, bed forms, bed load, suspended load, natural river processes; theory and practice of movable-bed model experiments.
Hydroclimatology 053:179 None No Instructor Listed Thermodynamic and flow characteristics of the atmosphere; occurrence of precipitation associated with mid-latitude weather systems, evaporation, measuring precipitation and evaporation, floods and droughts, regional precipitation climatology, atmospheric dynamics
Vadose Zone Hydrology

053:181;

also

012:187*

012:166 or 053:078 or equivalent   Introduction to vadose zone hydrology; development and application of equations describing flow and transport in vadose zone, including multiphase flow; field and laboratory methods for vadose zone characterization, vadose zone processes that cause groundwater contamination; case studies to illustrate vadose zone hydrology’s importance in engineering design, groundwater contamination.
Contaminant Hydrogeology

053:186;

also

012:186*

012:166 or 053:103 or consent of instructor   See ISIS
Environmental Engineering Seminar 053:192 senior or graduate standing Richard L Valentine, Keri C Hornbuckle See ISIS
Contemporary Topics in Civil and Environmental Engineering:  The Technological Singularity-Impacts and Implications 053:195 None Wilfrid A Nixon In 1993, Vernor Vinge coined the term “the singularity” to describe a moment in technological development beyond which we cannot visualize what future technological developments will be. The purpose of this course is to explore what the technological singularity is, where technology is today in terms of the singularity, and what the likely impacts and implications of the singularity will be. The primary focus of the technologies considered in the class will be the bio-nano-info technologies (biotechnology, nanotechnology, and information technology). While the course number indicates a class in civil and environmental engineering, this course is NOT intended solely for such students, but for any student, regardless of College or Major, who has an interest in the implications of future technological development upon society.
Advanced Subsurface Hydrology

053:196;

also

012:196*

012:166 or engineering equivalent

Co-requisites:
012:187 or 053:181, and 012:186 or 053:186

  See ISIS
Environmental Health Policy

053:204;

also

152:252, 175:252

None David Osterberg Major concerns in environment and human health, legislation enacted to deal with these concerns; examples in renewable energy and translation of science to policy; emphasis on contemporary issues. 
Hydrogeology Seminar

053:215;

also

012:210*

012:166 or
consent of instructor
  See ISIS
Advanced Environmental Chemistry 053:252 None No Instructor Listed See ISIS
Environmental Processes of Organic Compounds 053:255 053:152 or consent of instructor Keri Hornbuckle

According to the Organization of Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD, Paris) there are over 70,000 (mostly organic) synthetic chemicals in daily use, including solvents, components of detergents, dyes and varnishes, additives in plastics and textiles,  chemicals used for construction, herbicides, insecticides, fungicides.  Control of these chemicals through engineered systems and predictions of their behavior once in the environment depend on a knowledge of the processes that govern their transport and transformations in the environment. Students will use and construct mathematical and computer models to predict the behavior of chemicals in engineered and natural systems.  Assessment of learning will be based on oral presentations of case studies in current scientific and engineering literature; homework/problem solving; and a final research report.

Environmental Dispersion Processes 053:272 None Serban G Constantinescu Review of classical diffusion theories; longitudinal dispersion, transverse and vertical mixing in free-surface turbulent shear flow; application to natural channels; selected topics including stream-tube models, mixing and dispersion of heated effluents.
Foundations in Bioremediation 053:274 053:151 Gene F Parkin Xenobiotic degradation mechanisms with focus on the relationship between chemical structure and biochemical reactivity; process optimization through engineered control of the environment; bioremediation case studies emphasizing site characterization, system selection, design, operation, trouble-shooting.

 

Economics

Course Name Number Prerequisites Professors Description
Environmental and Natural Resource Economics 06E:133 None Stacey L Brook No detailed description is provided.
Natural Resource Economics 06E:183 06E:104 and 06E:105, and understanding of intermediate economics, microeconomic theory Stacey L Brook See ISIS

 

Educational Policy and Leadership Studies

Course Name Number Prerequisites Professors Description
Development Policy and Planning in the Third World

07B:275;

also

034:275, 042:275, 044:275*, 102:275, 113:275

None Douglas K Midgett Development policies and planning in Third World countries; important development problems and alternative perspectives on problems and proposed solutions; interdisciplinary seminar.

 

Electrical and Computer Engineering

Course Name Number Prerequisites Professors Description
Introductory Solid State Physics

055:173;

also

029:193

029:140 & 22M:028, or 22M:047 & 22M:048 Michael Flatte Phenomena associated with solid state; classification of solids and crystal structures, electronic and vibrational properties in solids; thermal, optical, magnetic, dielectric properties of solids.
Semiconductor Physics

055:273;

also

029:229

029:193, 029:246 Michael Flatte Electronic, optical, and materials properties of semiconductors.

 

English

Course Name Number Prerequisites Professor Description
Seminar Interdiscipline Studies: Post-Normal Living: Disability, Design and Sustainable Communities 008:095     Just as the inter-disciplinary field of Disability Studies interrogates the social or historical forces associated with the construction of normalcy, emerging assistive technologies and legislated accommodations for people with physical and learning disabilities has lead to the incorporation of "universal design" in several areas of community planning. This course will examine the changing nature of disability vs. "normalcy" with a focus on current trends in organizational and social planning; architecture; medicine; social systems; and reflections of these trends in the arts. We will draw on a variety of writers and thinkers including: Ray Kurzweil, Susan Sontag, Kenny Fries, John Hockenberry, as well as examining United Nations charters and the Copenhagen Consortium.
Honors Proseminar: Critical Regionalisms 008:098 None Cheryl Herr This course attends to the intertwined histories of the American midwest and the homelands of inwardly migrant communities (Irish, German, Ecuadorian, etc) to foreground the question of sustainability in the context of cyclic rural crises and the global role of agribusiness. The course foregrounds literary and cinematic depictions of, say, Iowa that have counterparts in the literature and film of migrants' homelands. The cultural transference and trasferrals between the two cultural landscapes offer critical insight into the wider industrial and post-industrial transformations of what they are part.
Topics in Popular Culture:  Food Studies and Popular Culture 008:136 Rhetoric or equivalent Doris S Witt See ISIS
Literature and Society 008:175   Claire Sponsler This course offers an introduction to American environmental literature and to the burgeoning field of ecocriticism, whose visibility has ushered in what some have called the “greening of the humanities.” In order to carve out a manageable slice from the wealth of available material, each week’s readings will explore a specific topic through one or two central texts, which we’ll consider in the context of selected historical and theoretical or critical essays (on reserve). Topics, in the order in which we’ll tackle them, will include: American pastoral, especially as inspired by Thoreau (Dillard and Abbey); history and the environment, including early European and Native American views of America (Hogan and Silko); nature and place, with a focus on Alaska (Lopez and Nelson); the ecology of the body and ecofeminism (Ehrlich and Williams); and the death of nature, or dystopias and alternate environments (Boyle). Writing assignments will include two analytical essays on issues suggested by the readings as well as a short creative piece on an environmental topic inspired by the course’s concerns. Our goal will be to learn about the past history, current practice, and critical contexts of the genre of American ecoliterature.
Literature and Society:  Capturing Animals

008:179*;

also

048:179

Rhetoric or equivalent Teresa L Mangum See ISIS
Crossing Borders Seminar

008:231;

also

01H:247, 013:262, 016:247, 030:242, 035:273, 044:286*, 048:247, 113:247, 129:231, 160:247, 181:247

None Rudolf Colloredo-Mansfeld, H G Penny, Rex D Honey See ISIS
Readings in American Literature III 008:258 None Linda Bolton Subtitle: Readings in the Ethics of Land and Environment
Issues in Rhetoric and Culture: Ethics of Care and Sustainability

008:263;

also

010:360*, 160:360

None   No detailed description is provided.
Topics in Interdisciplinary Studies: Introduction to Food Studies 008:272 Rhetoric or equivalent Doris S Witt See ISIS
Seminar Medieval Literature and Culture

008:402*;

also

048:402

None Claire Sponsler See ISIS

 

Environmental Sciences

Course Name Number Prerequisites Professor Description
Introduction to Environmental Science

159:008;

also

012:008*

None Frank H Weirich, Elmer A Bettis III Biological and physical character of the Earth; interaction of humans with the environment, including impacts on ecosystems, climate, natural processes, resources; alternative options, including sustainability, waste management, energy, land reform. See ISIS
Earth Surface Processes

159:102;

also

012:102*

012:005 or 012:008 or 044:003 or consent of instructor Frank H Weirich See ISIS
Introduction to Applied Remote Sensing

159:110;

also

012:110*

College physics or physical geology or equivalent Michael C Rowe See ISIS
Ecology

159:134;

also

002:134*

002:010;

002:011;

and 22M:016 or 22M:021, 22M:025, or 22M:035

Stephen D Hendrix See ISIS
Geocomputing

159:153;

and

012:153*

environmental science or geoscience major or consent of instructor;

Recommended:

22C:007

You-Kuan Zhang Computer applications in geoscience; visualization, data
management, interactive modeling, computer graphics. See ISIS
Environmental Field Methods

159:194;

and

012:194*

None Frank H Weirich, Elmer A Bettis III, Douglas J Schnoebelen, Timothy L Stroope See ISIS

 

Epidemiology

Course Name Number Prerequisites Professor Description
International Health

173:111;

also

152:111, 175:111*

Graduate standing, sophomore medical student, or advanced undergraduate standing Lars Fuortes See ISIS
Research Methods in Disaster Studies

173:175;

also

175:175*

None Corinne Peek-Asa See ISIS

 

 

Geography

Course Name Number Prerequisites Professor Description
Introduction to Human Geography 044:001 None Claire E Pavlik See ISIS
Introduction to Earth System Science 044:003 None Sunday D Goshit See ISIS
Foundations of Geographic Information    Science 044:005 None David A Bennett This is an introductory course in geographic Information science that teaches students about, for example, how geographic features are mapped, the data structures used to store these features in computers, and common analytical tools supported by GIS software. Students learn concepts in lecture and gain hands on experience with GIS technologies (GIS software, global positioning systems) in lab. While the content of this course is not necessarily focused on issues of sustainability, the tools and techniques presented in this class are generalizable to a large number of academic disciplines, including sustainability science. See ISIS
The Contemporary Global System 044:010 None Consuelo Guayara This introductory course examines various perspectives on globalization—as a way to introduce students to the globalization debate— and vital current issues regarding the ways in which the global system operates and it’s highly differentiated economic, political, cultural, and environmental consequences. This course is divided into four sections: a) examination of global production system and its environmental impacts (e.g., natural resources, food production and food security); b) exploration of the role of the state, institutions, and modes of governance; c) examination of the cultural and gendered impacts of globalization, and finally d) exploration of the social responses to globalization (e.g., environmentalism, ethical consumption, food sovereignty, feminism, cosmopolitan activism, and fundamentalism).
Population Geography 044:011 None Gerard Rushton, Geoffrey H Smith See ISIS
Contemporary Environmental Issues 044:019 None Rangaswamy Rajagopal See ISIS
First-Year Seminar:  Environment/  Society Classics: The Power of Enduring Ideas 044:029 None Rangaswamy Rajagopal See ISIS
The Global Economy 044:030 None Claire E Pavlik The focus of this course is on the distribution of factors of production and economic activities across regions and countries, emphasizing contemporary patterns of economic transactions and commodity flows. Globalization of production systems is a primary theme; factors contributing to economic and social problems, including environmental degradation, non-renewable resources, and sustain ability are included. See ISIS
Climatology

044:101*;

also

012:104

044:003 or consent of instructor Christian V Shorey Boundary layer processes that drive atmospheric dynamics; exchanges of energy and water at simple and complex surfaces; global climate change records, theories, models, impacts of climate on society. See ISIS
Biogeography

044:103;

also

002:103*

002:001,

or 002:010 and 002:011,

or 044:003,

or consent of instructor

George P Malanson, Diana Horton Biogeography is the study of the distribution of organisms across the earth. We will look at three questions: Why are organisms and groups of organisms where they are?; What does location mean for them?; and Why do the numbers of species vary from place to place? The basis of biogeography is evolution and ecology; evolutionary relations determine the potential mix of species in an area, ecological relations determine where species can live, and the two together determine where species are actually found and in what balance. In this course we will examine the environmental, spatial, and historical controls on the distribution of species, what forms those distributions take, and what methodologies are used for studies in biogeography. The diversity of species will be a special topic. The role of humans in modifying the biogeography of other species and the potential application of biogeographic knowledge in land use and conservation will be studied (in addition to the biogeography of Homo sapiens!). We will look at what kinds of evidence are brought to bear on the key questions. See ISIS
Environment and Development 044:104 None Consuelo Guayara This course provides conceptual tools to understand the relationship between Nature and Society. Dominant contemporary perspectives of environmental change and human-environment interactions are examined. Current debates over development and environment are explored through case-studies drawn from Latin America, Africa, and Asia. Changing and conflicting notions of “nature,” “environment,” “development,” and “sustainable development” are at the center of the discussion as well as their implications for political practices. Therefore poststructuralist concerns with the construction of knowledge and politics of representation are emphasized. Environmental issues are examined seeking to understand the complex relations between nature and society at multiple scales. New social movements that link the “politics of distribution” (economic and ecological justice) and “the politics of recognition” (human rights and cultural identity) are also examined. Social networks and transnational coalitions become the counterpoint of the deepening reach of transnational capital. Impacts of globalization are analyzed at various political arenas: body, households, locally imagined communities, environment, institutions, state and new forms of governance.
Introduction to Environmental Remote Sensing 044:105

044:005

or equivalent

or consent of instructor

Marc A Linderman See ISIS
Introduction to Geographic Visualization 044:109 044:005 Kathleen Stewart See ISIS
Geographic Information Science for Environmental Studies 044:110

044:005

or consent of instructor

David A Bennett This is the first in a two course sequence focused on the application of geographic Information science to environmental problems. Building on the concepts and skills taught in 44:005, students learn about such topics as advanced data storage and problem solving techniques, error analysis, interpolation, and database design. Again, the concepts and theories discussed in lecture are balanced with practical knowledge gained in the computer laboratory. Many current laboratory exercises are directly applicable to sustainability science. For example, students use GIS software to investigate the geographic pattern of non-point pollution, the habitat requirements of a reintroduced species, and suitable locations for a sanitary landfill. The goal of these exercises is to present to students near real-world problems and to help them develop realistic responses to associated challenges. See ISIS
Mapping American Cities 044:112

044:005

or consent of instructor

Claire E Pavlik The social and economic conditions of US metropolitan areas are the key themes of this course. Students are introduced to the organization of urban areas and many of the social issues that accompany the built environment and social polarization typical of US cities. Using a case study metropolitan area of their choice, they examine the history of development, urban spatial structure, and economic and social segregation. See ISIS
Landscape Ecology 044:123 None Chris Pigge The objectives of this course are to examine the ways in which spatial patterns and spatial processes operate in an ecological context and to consider the techniques used by landscape ecologists in their work. Ecological landscapes are made up of the pattern of organisms on a portion of the Earth, and the processes by which the organisms and the patterns are maintained are determined in part by their relative location. We will begin with fundamental principles that affect how landscapes are characterized. We will then consider the concepts and methods that are used to identify and measure spatial patterns. Spatial processes such as dispersal and the flow of nutrients across ecological boundaries are affected by the patterns; students will learn how these processes are identified, measured, and modeled. We will consider the fundamental feedbacks by which landscapes of organisms are reproduced; how landscapes change and how this change can be studied. We will then examine the landscape ecology of particular geographies, including urban, rural and mountain. We will also examine how landscape ecology is applied to problems of environmental management.
Gender and Environment 044:124 None; undergrads only No Instructor Listed This course provides different conceptual tools to understand the relationship between gender and environment. Theorizing “nature,” “gender,” “environment,” “women,” “race” “ethnicity” examining their various political practices, as well as the relationship between gender and environmental activism both in “the North” and “The South” are central endeavors in this course. Some of the perspectives to be discussed are ecofeminism, feminist political ecology, alternatives approaches to gender and environment, and politics of knowledge production. This course emphasizes the social construction of gender and environment.
Environmental Impact Analysis

044:125*;

also

102:125

None Rangaswamy Rajagopal See ISIS
Wetlands: Geography, Function, and Management

044:126*;

also

012:126

044:103

or a 100-level course in ecology

or consent of instructor

George P Malanson Wetlands are ecosystems whose importance to the functioning of landscapes exceeds their relative area. They are also important for the illustration of the intersection of several approaches to the study of the environment. The structure and function of wetlands is influenced by climate and hydrology, geomorphology and chemistry, and ecology. Because of their role in affecting the ecological landscape and factors of interest to people, such as water quality, their study is also approached from areas of resource economics and law. In this class, all approaches will be covered, although the emphasis is on the ecological response to changing hydrology. We will examine the basic processes in wetlands in terms of their hydrology, geomorphology, chemistry, and ecology, and then go on to examine how these processes play out in different regions to create different kinds of wetlands. We will address how wetlands are valued, used, and protected at the end of the semester. The intent of the class is that you learn the basics of wetland science and you will build a foundation for possible future work.
Environmental Quality: Science, Technology, and Policy 044:127

22S:025

or equivalent

or consent of instructor

Rangaswamy Rajagopal See ISIS
Geographical Information Science for Environmental Studies:  Application 044:128

044:110

or consent of instructor

David A Bennett This is the second in a two course sequence focused on the application of geographic Information science to environmental problems. This is a projects driven course. The first two to three laboratory projects completed by students are presented by the instructor. Students then have the opportunity to apply the knowledge and skills learned in 44:005 and 44:110 to real-world problems of their choosing. The learning curve associated with GIS technologies is steep and many students need considerable assistance during early coursework. The goal of this class is to foster independent problem solving skills. Self-directed and environmentally relevant GIS projects provide excellent opportunities for students engaged in sustainability science to synthesize theory and practice towards the end of their program of study. The current instructor (Professor Bennett) would welcome the opportunity to work with other faculty and students associated with a sustainability curriculum to develop independent projects that could, for example, support undergraduate, honors, or graduate-level thesis work. See ISIS
Health and Environment:  GIS Applications 044:137 None Naresh Kumar The course trains students in modern geo-spatial technologies to understand the linkages between environment and health outcomes, which, in turn, allow students to answer such critical environmental questions as “what social and physical environments are sustainable for public health?” While lectures and reading material aid students to critically think through conceptual and theoretical aspects of the use of GIS to understand the association between environment and health, well developed laboratory assignments along with data and a class project provides them technical skills in geo-spatial technologies to study the health effects of environmental contaminants.
Introduction to Geographic Databases 044:141

044:005 for undergrads;

consent of instructor for graduates

Kathleen Stewart See ISIS
Health, Work, and Environment

044:174;

also

175:101*

None David Osterberg Health, Work and Environment begins with John Muir & Edith Hamilton, strong persons who helped to build the environmental movement in the United States. The course covers environmental health which is different from environmental science. The course covers pollution of soil, air and water but also covers food contamination and waste generation. Segments of the class also look at occupational illness and injury. The human being is the focus of the course.
Environmental Justice 044:177 None Rex D Honey See ISIS
Field Methods in Physical Geography 044:180 None Marc A Linderman See ISIS
Field Methods in Social/ Environmental Geography 044:181 None David A Bennett For the past several years this course has been taught as a field-based GIS course. Students learn about the application of global positioning system technology, mobile computing technologies, sampling strategies, privacy and the ethics of field-based data collection technologies, and the growing importance of ubiquitous computing and cyber infrastructure. This class will teach students about the responsible use of technology as they gather the data needed to manage for landscape-scale sustainability. See ISIS
Quaternary Environments

044:183;

also

012:173*

Consent of instructor Jeffrey A Dorale Archaeological, botanical, zoological, physical, chemical means of reconstructing glacial and interglacial environments; techniques, results; interdisciplinary approach; field trips. See ISIS
Soil Genesis and Geomorphology

044:186;

also

012:136*

012:003 or 012:005, and familiarity with basic sedimentology Elmer A Bettis III Principals of soil classification, soil profile description; influences of geologic materials, climate, biota, geomorphic processes on soil development; labs, weekend field trip. See ISIS
Applied Geostatistics

044:188;

also

012:178*

None You-Kuan Zhang Applications of geostatistical methods to geology, geography, hydrology, environmental sciences, and engineering; variogram, Kriging, analysis of spatial-varied data with varied computer software in participants’ specialties.
Geographic Perspectives on Development 044:194 None Rex D Honey See ISIS
Special Topics:  International Environmental Policy 044:197 None Rangaswamy Rajagopal, Edwin P Brands The course consist of a mixture of in-class presentations and discussions, guest speakers, and focus on a broad sample of international environmental problems (e.g. biodiversity, climate change, desertification, ocean dumping and others), treaties and other policy initiatives (Convention on Biodiversity, Kyoto Protocol), and local, national, and regional scale perspectives and evaluations of such initiatives.  Students are required to produce a high quality presentation detailing findings on a research topic of their own choosing. The purposes of this course are threefold: 1) broaden horizons by examining environmental problems and policy from an international perspective; 2) improve conceptualization, organization, and research skills 3) enhance technical and “personal” presentation abilities.
Special Topics:  Microfinance for Women-run Enterprises 044:197 None Rangaswamy Rajagopal See ISIS
Special Topics:  Field Experiences in Social Entrepreneurship 044:197 None No Instructor Listed Social entrepreneurs are described as “new heroes,” people who often work against the odds to find solutions where others only see problems (e.g. poverty and unemployment, environmental problems, lack of infrastructure). Often (but not always) working in developing countries, social entrepreneurs observe that part of society is stuck, and find ways to get it unstuck. In this course, we will visit, participate with, and learn directly from more than 8 organizations employing a diverse variety of techniques to address social problems such as child labor, unemployment, poverty, leprosy, healthcare for the poor, illiteracy, community waste management, schools for the handicapped. While some of the organizations we meet with are focused on a single or a few focused issues, others are aimed at sowing seeds of change by training the next generation of change-makers.
Special Topics:  Globalization in the Developing World 044:197 None Consuelo Guayara See ISIS
Environmental/ Social Systems Analysis 044:225 Consent of instructor Rangaswamy Rajagopal See ISIS
Environmental Quality: Science, Technology, and Policy 044:227 None Rangaswamy Rajagopal See ISIS
Integrating Time into GIS 044:241     The study of temporal aspects within geographic information science offers new perspectives for understanding and communicating information. A wide range of GIS applications involve time-varying data. Examples include monitoring ocean currents or the weather, modeling disease outbreaks, and tracking the movements of people and animals in space-time. This course introduces students to fundamental concepts for integrating temporality into GIS. This course covers: conceptual models of time, formal models of time, models of change, event-based modeling, and modeling moving entities. In addition, the course will cover topics relating to fundamentals of spatiotemporal databases and query languages.
Simulations in Landscape Ecology 044:242     The dynamics of land use/land cover change, either as a result of human-environment interaction or natural driving forces, must be seen in spatially-explicit representations in order to link them to real places.  One avenue for exploring dynamics is computer simulation. The purpose of this course is to take students to an advanced use of computer simulations in landscape ecology.  We will explore how simulation is currently used in the field.  Additionally, students will do simulations on landscape ecology questions and analyze the results using typical landscape ecology metrics. We will move back and forth between discussion of the principles and applications of simulation as seen in readings and doing simulations.
Modeling Space and Time 044:243     Socio-physical environments across time and space are important determinants of social, behavioral and health outcomes, for example socio-economic environment and the concentration of air pollution at given time and space can dramatically affect an individual’s asthma and mental setup. This course will enable students to develop conceptual and theoretical understanding of and hands on experiences in – (a) how to generate time-space resolved estimates of socio-physical environmental contexts with the aid of modern geo-spatial technologies, and (b) how to model these social, behavioral and health outcomes with reference to these multi-level time-space resolved socio-physical environmental contexts.  The course will cover a wide range of environmental contexts starting from the concentration of air pollution and pesticides to neighborhood diversity. Students will be exposed to statistical modeling of a wider variety of social, behavioral and health outcomes, including college dropout, onset and progression of smoking, obesity/overweight, asthma, mental and physical disability.
Planning Sustainable Transportation

044:265;

also

102:265*

None John W Fuller See ISIS
Development Policy and Planning in the Third World

044:275*;

also

07B:275,

034:275,

042:275,

102:275,

and

113:275

None Douglas K Midgett Development policies and planning in Third World countries; important development problems and alternative perspectives on problems and proposed solutions; interdisciplinary seminar.
Crossing Borders Seminar

044:286*;

also

01H:247,

008:231,

013:262,

016:247,

030:242,

035:273,

048:247,

113:247,

129:231,

160:247,

and

181:247

None Claire Fox, Harilaos Stecopoulos See ISIS
Crossing Borders Pro-Seminar

044:287*;

also

01H:330,

13:260,

16:244,

30:243,

35:271,

48:244,

and

113:248

None Rex D Honey See ISIS
Topics in Geographic Information Science

044:296;

also 044:113

None   Current theoretical research issues in geographic information science; intensive readings. Repeatable.
Special Topics 044:297 None Gerard Rushton See ISIS
Seminar in Spatial Analysis and Modeling 044:315 None   Research themes in spatial analysis, GIScience, simulation, remote sensing.
Seminar in Rural Land Use 044:316 None   Research on land use, water resources, conservation. See ISIS
Seminar in Environmental Policy 044:317 None   Research on environmental justice and policy.
Seminar in Health and Environment 044:318 None Naresh Kumar Research on health and environment. See ISIS
Seminar in International Development 044:319 None Rex D Honey Research on GIScience and development. See ISIS

 

Geoscience

Course Name Number Prerequisites Professor Description
Lectures in Earth History and Resources

012:001;

also

012:003

no prior registration in 012:003 William C McClelland, Ingrid A Ukstins Peate Relationships between plate tectonics, geologic time, and the rock cycle with volcanoes and igneous, sedimentary, metamorphic rocks; fossils; radioactive isotopes; landscape evolution; mountain building; natural resources; their impacts on civilization. GE: natural sciences.
Earth History and Resources

012:003;

also

012:001

None William C McClelland, Ingrid A Ukstins Peate Relationships between plate tectonics, geologic time, and the rock cycle with volcanoes and igneous, sedimentary, metamorphic rocks; fossils; radioactive isotopes; landscape evolution; mountain building; natural resources; their impacts on civilization. GE: natural sciences.
Evolution and the History of Life 012:004 no prior registration in 012:006 Ann F Budd, Julia B McHugh, Troy R Fadiga, Stephanie K Drumheller, Julia B McHugh See ISIS
Introduction to Geology 012:005 No prior registration in 012:001 or 012:003 Philip H Heckel Minerals, rocks, and rock-forming processes (including volcanoes and sedimentary environments); surface processes (rivers, groundwater, glaciers, deserts, ocean shorelines), major earth processes (continental drift, plate tectonics, earthquakes, mountain building); impact on civilization. Offered fall semesters.
Age of Dinosaurs 012:007 None Christopher A Brochu See ISIS
Introduction to Environmental Science

012:008*;

also

159:008

None Frank H Weirich, Elmer A Bettis III Biological and physical character of the Earth; interaction of humans with the environment, including impacts on ecosystems, climate, natural processes, resources; alternative options, including sustainability, waste management, energy, land reform. GE: natural sciences. Same as 159:008.
Geology of the U.S. National Parks 012:017 None Richard G Baker Geologic features, geologic history, important biological and archaeological characteristics, with emphasis on features that caused certain areas to be included in national park system.
Geology Field Trip: Selected National Parks 012:018 None Jeffrey A Dorale, Susan M Kilgore Observation, interpretation of prominent geologic, geomorphic, biological features; semester-break or semester-end visits to different parks or groups of parks each year.
Earth Surface Processes

012:102*;

also

159:102

012:005 or 012:008 or 044:003 or consent of
instructor
Frank H Weirich See ISIS
Climatology

012:104;

also

044:101*

044:003 or consent of instructor Christian V Shorey Boundary layer processes that drive atmospheric dynamics; exchanges of energy and water at simple and complex surfaces; global climate change records, theories, models, impacts of climate on society.
Introduction to Oceanography 012:108 None Philip H Heckel Descriptive, chemical, physical, biological, geological aspects of oceans; impact on weather, climate, shorelines, food supply, other aspects of civilization. Offered spring semesters. Recommended: knowledge of basic chemistry, biology, physics, earth science.
Introduction to Applied Remote Sensing

012:110*;

also

159:110

College physics or physical geology or
equivalent
Michael C Rowe See ISIS
Energy and the Environment 012:114 012:003 or 012:005 or 012:008 or consent of instructor Qing Zhang See ISIS
Principles of Paleontology 012:121 None Jonathan M Adrain Patterns of evolution in fossil record; species and analysis of their evolutionary relationships; paleoecology, paleocommunity evolution; evolutionary radiation and mass extinctions; large-scale relationships between biodiversity and climatic change. Offered fall semesters.
Evolution of the Vertebrates 012:122 Introductory course in geoscience or bioscience Christopher A Brochu Evolutionary history of vertebrates revealed by fossils and information from living animals; biogeographic, stratigraphic, paleoecological aspects of selected groups, especially mammals and dinosaurs; transitions from aquatic to terrestrial life, origins of flight, major events in vertebrate history (including mass extinctions and explosive radiations).
Wetlands: Geography, Function and Management

012:126;

also

044:126*

044:103 or a 100-level course in ecology or consent of instructor George P Malanson Wetlands are ecosystems whose importance to the functioning of landscapes exceeds their relative area.  They are also important for the illustration of the intersection of several approaches to the study of the environment.  The structure and function of wetlands is influenced by climate and hydrology, geomorphology and chemistry, and ecology.  Because of their role in affecting the ecological landscape and factors of interest to people, such as water quality, their study is also approached from areas of resource economics and law.  In this class, all approaches will be covered, although the emphasis is on the ecological response to changing hydrology.  We will examine the basic processes in wetlands in terms of their hydrology, geomorphology, chemistry, and ecology, and then go on to examine how these processes play out in different regions to create different kinds of wetlands.  We will address how wetlands are valued, used, and protected at the end of the semester.  The intent of the class is that you learn the basics of wetland science and you will build a foundation for possible future work.

Sedimentary Geology/

Stratigraphy

012:130 Co-requisite 012:052 Philip H Heckel Basic concepts of sedimentology, stratigraphy, depositional environments, sedimentary petrology; hands-on analyses of sediments and sedimentary rocks, including thin-section petrolography; lecture/laboratory.  Offered spring semesters. 
Soil Genesis and Geomorphology

012:136*;

also

044:186

012:003 or 012:005, and familiarity with basic sedimentology Elmer A Bettis III Principles of soil classification, soil profile description; influences of geologic materials, climate, biota, geomorphic processes on soil development; labs, weekend field trip. Prerequisites: college earth science and chemistry.
Fluvial Geomorphology

012:138*;

also

053:128

None No Instructor Listed See ISIS
Integrated Watershed Analysis 012:139 None Frank H Weirich Integration of existing knowledge of physical, hydrological, and environmental processes with management issues and challenges in water resources and environmental management; aspects of water quantity and quality, water use and treatment; basin management issues related to forestry, agriculture, urbanization, floods, droughts.
Natural Hazards 012:140 None Ingrid A Ukstins Peate, Jessica L Bruse Causes, effects, occurrence patterns, predictabilities, and
mitigation efforts relevant to geological and other natural hazards; background and case studies. GE: natural sciences.
Vertebrate Osteology and Phylogeny 012:142 012:122 or 113:190 or consent of instructor Christopher A Brochu See ISIS
Phylogenetics and Biodiversity 012:144 012:004 or 012:121, or
002:010 and 002:011, or consent of instructor
Jonathan M Adrain Methods available for reconstructing evolutionary history and measuring biodiversity, including distance, parsimony, likelihood, and taxic approaches; applications to molecular and morphological systematics, historical biogeography, study of diversity through time.
Isotope Geochemistry 012:152 012:149 or consent of instructor Mark K Reagan, Jeffrey A Dorale Radiogenic and stable isotope systematics, applications to geological, cosmological, and environmental problems.
 
Geocomputing

012:153*;

also

159:153

environmental science or geoscience major or consent of instructor You-Kuan Zhang Computer applications in geoscience; visualization, data management, interactive modeling, computer graphics.
Hydrogeology 012:166 Senior or graduate
standing
Douglas J Schnoebelen, Timothy L Stroope See ISIS
Paleoecology 012:170 012:121; two courses in geoscience, anthropology, biological sciences, environmental science, or geography; or consent of instructor Hallie J Sims, Ann F Budd See ISIS
Paleobotany 012:171 Two courses
in geoscience, anthropology, biological sciences, environmental
science, or geography; or consent of instructor
Hallie J Sims See ISIS
Glacial and Pleistocene Geology 012:172 None Elmer A Bettis III Interactions among glaciers, oceans, and climate; glacier
dynamics; evolution of Earth’s Pleistocene and landscapes; Pleistocene stratigraphy. 
Quaternary Environments

012:173*;

also

044:183

Consent of instructor Jeffrey A Dorale Archaeological, botanical, zoological, physical, chemical means of reconstructing glacial and interglacial environments; techniques, results; interdisciplinary approach; field trips.
Applied Geostatistics

012:178*;

also

044:188

None You-Kuan Zhang Applications of geostatistical methods to geology, geography, hydrology, environmental sciences, and engineering; variogram, Kriging, analysis of spatial-varied data with varied computer software in participants’ specialties.
Engineering Geology

012:179;

also

053:105*

Sophomore standing

Michelle M Scherer Basic concepts in geology focusing on rock and soil, including material properties, spatial variability in properties, geological processes, external factors such as stress, evaluation of engineering design adequacy; site investigation and characterization techniques used to define and characterize geotechnical and hydrological properties of geological materials; case studies to illustrate the importance of geology on engineering designs.
Groundwater Modeling

012:184*;

also

053:104

012:166 or 053:103 or equivalent or consent of instructor You-Kuan Zhang Groundwater flow and contaminant transport modeling;
numerical methods, applications of groundwater modeling to
water supply, groundwater resources evaluation, remediation
design using software; GMS (MODFLOW, MODPATH, and
MT3D).
Approaches to Geoarchaeology

012:185*;

also

113:189

012:136 or 012:172 or 113:161 or 113:164 or consent of
instructor
Elmer A Bettis III See ISIS
Contaminant Hydrogeology

012:186*;

also

053:186

012:166 or 053:103 or consent of instructor Walter A Illman See ISIS
Vadose Zone Hydrology

012:187*;

also

053:181

012:166 or 053:078 or equivalent Walter A Illman Introduction to vadose zone hydrology; development and application of equations describing flow and transport in vadose zone, including multiphase flow; field and laboratory methods for vadose zone characterization, vadose zone processes that cause groundwater contamination; case studies to illustrate vadose zone hydrology’s importance in engineering design, groundwater contamination.
Environmental Seminar 012:188 None You-Kuan Zhang See ISIS
Global Change Seminar 012:189 None Richard L Josephs See ISIS
Environmental Field Methods

012:194*;

also

159:194

None Frank H Weirich, Elmer A Bettis III, Douglas J Schnoebelen, Timothy L Stroope See ISIS
 
Advanced Subsurface Hydrology

012:196*;

also

153:196

012:166 or engineering equivalent

Co-requisites:
012:187 or 053:181, and 012:186 or 053:186

Walter A Illman See ISIS
 
Hydrogeology Seminar

012:210*;

also

053:215

012:166 or
consent of instructor
Walter A Illman See ISIS
Paleontology Seminar 012:225 Recommended: 012:121 Jonathan M Adrain Current controversial issues in paleontology. Repeatable.
Process Geomorphology arr. 012:238 Consent of instructor Frank H Weirich See ISIS
Advanced Watershed Analysis Seminar arr. 012:239 None Frank H Weirich Integration of existing knowledge of physical, hydrological, and environmental processes with management issues and challenges in water resources and environmental management; aspects of water quantity and quality, water use and treatment, and basin management issues related to forestry, agriculture, urbanization, floods, droughts. Repeatable.
Geochronology 012:253 012:149 or 012:152 or equivalent or consent of
instructor
David W Peate How to evaluate published ages, and assumptions/errors involved; how to select and sample suitable materials for dating, and choose a suitable dating method and analytical technique; opportunity to develop skills for research and professional careers.

 

German

Course Name
Number
Prerequisites Professor Description
Crossing Borders Pro-Seminar

013:260;

also

01H:330, 016:244, 030:243, 035:271, 044:287*, 048:244, 113:248

None Rex D Honey No detailed description is provided.
Crossing Borders Seminar

013:262;

also

008:231, 01H:247, 016:247, 030:242, 035:273, 044:286*, 048:247, 113:247, 129:231, 160:247, 181:247

None Rudolf Colloredo-Mansfeld, H G Penny, Rex D Honey See ISIS

 

 

Global Health Studies

Course Name
Number
Prerequisites Professor Description
International Health

152:111;

also

175:111*, 173:111

Graduate standing, sophomore medical student, or advanced undergraduate standing Lars Fuortes See ISIS
History of Public Health

152:137*;

also

16W:137

None Paul R Greenough See ISIS
History of International Health

152:138;

also

16W:138*

None Paul R Greenough See ISIS
Principles of Environmental Engineering

152:162;

also

053:055*

053:050

or consent of instructor

Gene F Parkin See ISIS
Environmental Health Policy

152:252;

also

053:204, 175:252

None David Osterberg Major concerns in environment and human health, legislation enacted to deal with these concerns; examples in renewable energy and translation of science to policy; emphasis on contemporary issues. 

 

History

Course Name Number Prerequisites Professor Description
History and Environment in Africa

16W:122*;

also

129:132

None James L Giblin See ISIS
History of Public Health

16W:137*;

also

152:137

None Paul R Greenough See ISIS
History of International Health

16W:138*;

also

152:138

None Paul R Greenough See ISIS
Disease Politics & Health in South Asia 16W:140 None Paul R Greenough See ISIS
Crossing Borders Pro-Seminar

016:244;

also

01H:330, 013:260, 030:243, 035:271, 044:287*, 048:244, 113:248

None Rex D Honey No detailed description is provided.
Crossing Borders Seminar

016:247;

also

008:231, 01H:247, 013:262, 030:242, 035:273, 044:286*, 048:247, 113:247, 129:231, 160:247, 181:247

None Rudolf Colloredo-Mansfeld, H G Penny, Rex D Honey See ISIS

 

Human Toxicology

Course Name
Number
Prerequisites Professor Description
Toxicology Research Seminar 198:180 None Hans-Joachim Lehmler See ISIS

 

Industrial Management

Course Name Number Prerequisites Professor Description
Design for Manufacturing

056:032*;

also

051:062;

058:032

Co-requisite:

057:015

Geb W Thomas See ISIS
Process Engineering 056:134 None Andrew Kusiak, Robert A Hamel See ISIS
Wind Power Management 056:155 None Andrew Kusiak See ISIS

 

International Writing Program

Course Name Number Prerequisites Professor Description
Crossing Borders Seminar

181:247;

also

008:231, 01H:247, 013:262, 016:247, 030:242, 035:273, 044:286*, 048:247, 113:247, 129:231, 160:247

None Rudolf Colloredo-Mansfeld, H G Penny, Rex D Honey See ISIS

 

 

Iowa Lakeside Laboratory

Course Name Number Prerequisites Professor Description
Aquatic Ecology 00L:103 Ecology, chemistry, and physics courses Kenneth Lang See ISIS
Plant Taxonomy 00L:105 None William R Norris See ISIS
Field Mycology 00L:115 None No Instructor Listed Identification and classification of the common fungi, techniques for identification, preservation and culture practiced with members of the various fungi groups.
Ecology and Systematics of Diatoms 00L:117 None Sarah A Spaulding, Mark B Edlund See ISIS
Plant Ecology 00L:121 None Thomas R Rosburg Principles of plant population, community, and ecosystem ecology illustrated through studies of native vegetation in local prairies, wetlands, forests, group or individual projects.
Prairie Ecology 00L:122 Familiarity with basic principles of biological sciences and ecology Daryl Smith See ISIS
Fish Ecology 00L:128 None No Instructor Listed Basic principles of fish interaction with biotic and abiotic environments; field methods, taxonomy, and biology of fish with emphasis on the fish fauna and northwestern Iowa.
Vertebrate Ecology and Evolution 00L:129 None No Instructor Listed Field and laboratory study of representative vertebrates of northwestern Iowa; observations and experimentation emphasize ecological histories by integrating concepts of functional morphology, behavioral ecology, evolutionary biology.
Ecosystems of North America 00L:144 A general ecology course No Instructor Listed Extended field trip for study of an ecosystem type (e.g., prairie, coastal wetland, forest, alpine, coral reef) or the ecosystems of a specific region (e.g. Rocky Mountains, Gulf Coast, Appalachian Mountains, deserts of the Southwest, Central America); pre-trip orientation, post-trip review and synthesis.  Field trip fee. 
Restoration Ecology 00L:160 An ecology course No Instructor Listed Ecological principles for restoration of native ecosystems; establishment (site preparation, selection of seed mixes, planting techniques) and management (fire, mowing, weed control) of native vegetation; evaluation of restorations; emphasis on prairie restoration, wetland vegetation.  
Conservation Biology 00L:163 00L:031 Michael Lannoo See ISIS

 

Law

Course Name Number Prerequisites Professor Description
Environmental Law 091:255 None John-Mark Stensvaag See ISIS
Health Law 091:261 None Sheldon F Kurtz See ISIS
International Trade Law:  Basic Norms and Regulation 091:287 None Christopher Rossi See ISIS
International Environmental Law 091:291 None Jonathan C Carlson See ISIS
Land Use Control 091:300 091:136 Lea S Vandervelde See ISIS
Clinical Law Program-Internship 091:406 None John S Allen, Lois K Cox, Reta Noblett-Feld, Leonard Sandler, Barbara A Schwartz, John B Whiston See ISIS
Independent Research Project (Paper Option) 091:500 None No Instructor Listed See ISIS
Independent Research Project (Drafting Documents Option) 091:500 None No Instructor Listed See ISIS
Independent Tutorial 091:504 None No Instructor Listed See ISIS
Cultural Property/Heritage 091:618 None Willard L Boyd, Richard F Koontz See ISIS

 

Leisure Studies

Course Name Number Prerequisites Professor Description
The Good Society

169:040*;

also

033:040

None Thomas K Dean, Ben Hunnicutt See ISIS
Intro to Place Studies

169:080*;

also

033:080

None Thomas K Dean See ISIS

 

 

Lifetime Leisure Skills

Course Name Number Prerequisites Professor Description
Bicycle Touring 410:043 None Irene R Schroeder See ISIS
Wilderness Appreciation 410:068 None Irene R Schroeder See ISIS

 

Literature, Science, and the Arts

Course Name Number Prerequisites Professor Description
The Good Society

033:040;

also

169:040

None Thomas K Dean, Ben Hunnicutt See ISIS
Intro to Place Studies

033:080;

also

169:080

None Thomas K Dean See ISIS
Religion and Environmental Ethics

033:139;

also

113:139*, 032:130

junior or senior standing or consent of instructor Scott R Schnell See ISIS

 

Mechanical Engineering

Course Name Number Prerequisites Professor Description
Design for Manufacturing

058:032;

also

051:062; 056:032*

Co-requisite:

057:015

Geb W Thomas See ISIS
Energy Systems Design 058:048

058:040

and

058:045

H S Udaykumar See ISIS
Mechanical Systems 058:052

057:019;

Co-requisites:

22S:039, 057:015, and

058:032

Olesya I Zhupanska, Justin McAndrew, Alan E Zantout See ISIS

 

Nursing

Course Name Number Prerequisites Professor Description
Public Health Nursing 096:153

096:135 and admission to the College of Nursing

Co-requisites: 096:124 (if not taken as a prerequisite)

Janette Y Taylor,
Kennith R Culp
No detailed description is provided.
Public Health Nursing Practicum 096:154

096:135 and 096:136

Co-requisites: 096:153 (if not taken as a prerequisite)

Susan P Lehmann, Beverly J Saboe, Lisa Skemp Kelley, Margaret M Hyndman, Lioness Ayres See ISIS

 

 

Occupational and Environmental Health

Course Name Number Prerequisites Professor Description
Health, Work, and Environment

175:101*;

also

044:174

None David Osterberg Health, Work and Environment begins with John Muir & Edith Hamilton, strong persons who helped to build the environmental movement in the United States. The course covers environmental health which is different from environmental science. The course covers pollution of soil, air and water but also covers food contamination and waste generation. Segments of the class also look at occupational illness and injury. The human being is the focus of the course.
International Health

175:111*;

also

152:111, 173:111

None Lars Fuortes See ISIS
Research Methods in Disaster Studies

175:175*;

also

173:175

None Corrine Peek-Asa See ISIS
Occupational and Environmental Health Seminar 175:180 None Thomas Cook See ISIS
Global Environmental Health 175:195 175:111, 175:197, or consent of instructor Larry Robertson See ISIS
Environmental Health 175:197 None Peter S Thorne, Gabriele Ludewig, Patrick T O'Shaughnessy Environmental health comprises those aspects of human health that are determined by interactions with physical, chemical, biological and social factors in the global environment. This course surveys all aspects, focusing on issues most relevant today.
Solid and Hazardous Wastes

175:198*;

also

053:158

053:050 Michelle M Scherer See ISIS
Rural Health and Ag Medicine 175:209

173:140

and medicine enrollment

or consent of instructor

Kelley J. Donham Clinical orientation of specific health problems of rural residents, agricultural workers; rural health care delivery, socioeconomic issues in agriculture and their effects on health and safety of the agricultural population; occupational health problems, environmental health hazards in rural areas
Current Topics in Ag Health 175:210 None Murray Madsen, Risto Rautiainen See ISIS
Occupational and Environmental Epidemiology 175:220

173:140

Co-requisites: 171:161, 175:197

or consent of instructor

R. William Field See ISIS
Occupational Health 175:230 None Craig Zwerling Principles, practice of occupational medicine, fundamentals of industrial hygiene and safety, occupational health management, ergonomics, occupational health nursing.
Environmental Health Policy

175:252*;

also

053:204

and 152:252

None David Osterberg See ISIS
Environmental Toxicology 175:260 Minimum of one year each of college inorganic chemistry and biology Laurence J Fuortes, Peter Thorne See ISIS
Advanced Toxicology 175:265

175:260

or the equivalent graduate-level introductory toxicology course

or consent of instructor

Larry Robertson, Gabriele Ludewig, Peter Thorne See ISIS

 

Physics and Astronomy

Course Name Number Prerequisites Professor Description

Nanoscience

029:002

None

Michael Flatte

See ISIS

Physics of Everyday Experience

029:006

None

Robert Merlino

See ISIS

Introductory Solid State Physics

029:193*;

also

055:173

029:140 & 22M:028, or 22M:047 & 22M:048

Michael Flatte

Phenomena associated with solid state; classification of solids and crystal structures, electronic and vibrational properties in solids; thermal, optical, magnetic, dielectric properties of solids.

Semiconductor Physics

029:229*;

also

055:273

029:193, 029:246

Michael Flatte

Electronic, optical, and materials properties of semiconductors.

 

 

Political Science

Course Name Number Prerequisites Professor Description
Introduction to Comparative Politics 030:045 None (no prior enrollment in 30:040 or in 30:042) Erica E Townsend-Bell See ISIS
Introduction to International Relations 030:060 None John A Conybeare See ISIS
Crossing Borders Seminar

030:242;

also

008:231, 01H:247, 013:262, 016:247, 035:273, 044:286*, 048:247, 113:247, 129:231, 160:247, 181:247

None Rudolf Colloredo-Mansfeld, H G Penny, Rex D Honey See ISIS
Crossing Borders Pro-Seminar

030:243;

also

01H:330, 013:260, 016:244, 035:271, 044:287*, 048:244, 113:248

None Rex D Honey No detailed description is provided.

 

 

Religious Studies

Course Name Number Prerequisites Professor Description
American Indian Environmentalism

032:076*;

also

149:076

None Michelene Pesantubbee See ISIS
Religion and Environmental Ethics

032:130;

also

113:139*, 033:139

Junior or senior standing or consent of instructor Scott R Schnell See ISIS

 

Rhetoric

Course Name Number Prerequisites Professor Description
Issues in Rhetoric and Culture: Ethics of Care and Sustainability

010:360*;

also

160:360, 008:263

None   No detailed description is provided.

 

Rhetorics of Inquiry

Course Name Number Prerequisites Professor Description
Crossing Borders Seminar

160:247;

also

008:231, 01H:247, 013:262, 016:247, 030:242, 035:273, 044:286*, 048:247, 113:247, 129:231, 181:247

None Rudolf Colloredo-Mansfeld, H G Penny, Rex D Honey See ISIS
Issues in Rhetoric and Culture: Ethics of Care and Sustainability

160:360;

also

010:360*, 008:263

None   No detailed description is provided.

 

 

School of Social Work

Course Name Number Prerequisites Professor Description
Development Policy and Planning in the Third World

042:275;

also

07B:275, 034:275, 044:275*, 102:275, 113:275

None   Development policies and planning in Third World countries; important development problems and alternative perspectives on problems and proposed solutions; interdisciplinary seminar.

 

Sociology

Course Name Number Prerequisites Professor Description
Deviance and Control 034:146 None Stacy M T Wittrock See ISIS
Development Policy and Planning in the Third World

034:275;

also

07B:275, 042:275, 044:275*, 102:275, 113:275

None   Development policies and planning in Third World countries; important development problems and alternative perspectives on problems and proposed solutions; interdisciplinary seminar.

 

Spanish and Portuguese

Course Name Number Prerequisites Professor Description
Crossing Borders Pro-Seminar

035:271;

also

01H:330, 013:260, 016:244, 030:243, 044:287*, 048:244, 113:248

None Rex D Honey No detailed description is provided.
Crossing Borders Seminar

035:273;

also

008:231, 01H:247, 013:262, 016:247, 030:242, 044:286*, 048:247, 113:247, 129:231, 160:247, 181:247

None Rudolf Colloredo-Mansfeld, H G Penny, Rex D Honey See ISIS

 

Study Abroad

Course Name Number Prerequisites Professor Description
International Perspectives:  Engineering 165:841 None Autumn Tallman See ISIS

 

Teaching and Learning

Course Name Number Prerequisites Professor Description
Sustainability and Education

07E:340*;

also

07S:340, 07U:340

None Christine M Moroye No detailed description is provided.

 

 

Theatre Arts

Course Name Number Prerequisites Professor Description
Environmental Design I

049:158;

also

01D:137*

01A:003, 01A:004 or consent of instructor Monica C D G Correia No detailed description is provided.

 

 

Urban and Regional Planning

Course Name Number Prerequisites Professor Description
Planning Livable Cities 102:101 None Barton E Cramer, Paul F Hanley See ISIS
Environmental Impact Analysis

102:125;

also

044:125*

None Rangaswamy Rajagopal See ISIS
Growth Management 102:235 102:202 Jerry Anthony See ISIS
Planning for Sustainable City-Regions 102:242 None James A Throgmorton See ISIS
Healthy Cities and the Environment 102:243 None Lucie Laurian See ISIS
Global Perspectives in Environmental Planning 102:244 None No Instructor Listed See ISIS
Environmental Policy 102:246 None Garth W Frable No detailed description is provided.
Environmental Management 102:247 None Lucie Laurian See ISIS
Planning Sustainable Transportation

102:265*;

also

044:265

None John W Fuller See ISIS
Development Policy and Planning in the Third World

102:275;

also

07B:275, 034:275, 042:275, 044:275*, 113:275

None   Development policies and planning in Third World countries; important development problems and alternative perspectives on problems and proposed solutions; interdisciplinary seminar.