New Welding Equipment: Why, How, Who

students welding in EMS

Why

Earlier this summer Al Altmaier (left above), a mechanical engineering student and EMS employee, said to his boss that the shop's welding equipment was wearing out, no parts were available locally, and it was obsolete 20 years ago.  Doug Eltoft asked Al to do some research and propose what new welding equipment he should purchase. Al spent a few days learning about the various welding equipment available and local support for any purchase. He proposed buying welders from Lincoln Electric because another employee in the EMS has experience with those welders and there is a local dealership to can supply replacement parts and repairs, if necessary. In addition the TIG 375 has the best current options and duty cycle. Al also suggested getting a portable welder, a new piece of equipment for EMS. Besides being portable, that welder can run with a 100' extension cord plugged into a free 20 amp circuit.

inside the portable welder case

Doug accepted the proposal and bought a Lincoln Electric Precision TIG 375 and a Lincoln Invertec V155 portable welder; read more about these welders

How

Lincoln TIG 375 welder These new welders are paid for with money provided by the student technology fee, so it is appropriate that the proposal for what type to buy was provided by a student. This mandatory fee supports "instructional computing demands by providing financial support to improve the quality and quantity of student computing resources (facilities, equipment, and services) and library and other information sources." [Registrar's Office, http://registrar.uiowa.edu/LinkClick.aspx?fileticket=9eQ4RAFMRt8%3D&tabid=202] If you are interested to see how the technology fee money is spent, look at the annual reports that detail how each academic unit spent those funds.
TIG375 in EMS

Who

To use the welding equipment (and any other equipment in the EMS), you need to be know basic safety procedures and have training on the specific equipment you want to use. Using the welders, for example, means that you also have to dress appropriately and use a welding hood and gloves. Stop in EMS, G450 SC, and talk to Steve Struckman, EMS manager, or Bill Jennings, EMS engineer, about the equipment there and training to use it.