EMS Articles

This series of articles highlights a project or activity occuring in the Engineering Machine Shop.

welder

  • Just before spring break, I asked Angelina what she was doing in her bicycle class. In the previous article, the class was using AutoCAD 2015 to design their bikes. Here is what has happened since then:

    March 30, 2015
  • The Mahaska County Conservation Board has acquired bones from the Oskaloosa mammoth, and a tibia, mammoth tibia vertebra, and hyoid from that collection were in the EMS for scanning and reproduction in the 3D printers. With the new FARO 3D scanner, scanning the tibia, which is about 27 inches long, is easy.

    March 05, 2015
  • The Engineering Machine Shop recently acquired a Faro arm laser scanner, and one of the first people to use it was Leah Taylor. Leah is a 1st year’s Masters BME (Biomedical Engineering) student, who does research in the UI Orthopaedic Biomechanics Lab (UIOBL). She scanned a model of a human femur. I asked her why, and got this elegant description of the orthopaedic surgical skills simulator project she is working on.

    February 27, 2015
  • When Angelina was in the fourth week of the bicycle class. I asked her what she was learning and what software she would use to design her bicycle. This image of a bicycle with parts labelled was a recent quiz; the class had to label all the parts of a bicycle.

    February 16, 2015
  • To meet interesting students and find out about their projects, I suggest going to the Engineering Machine Shop, G450 SC. That is where I met Angelina Boulicault, who is taking the hand-built bicycle course, TDSN:4250, this spring. The class is described this way: “Building a bicycle frame by hand; use of CAD modeling and development of fabrication skills to create a modern-day work of art.” This series of articles will follow Angelina’s progress in designing and building her bicycle.

    February 05, 2015
  • All of the things that I have seen cut by the waterjet cutter have been metal. But recently that device cut several 6” slabs of cork. Why cork? And who would do that? Alex Zeppieri, who is a CEE major with an art minor, explained how he came to have thick chunks of cork cut in the Engineering Machine Shop. He elucidated:

    December 10, 2014
  • Detector element cases printed on 3D printers for CERN.

    October 29, 2014
  • This computer classroom was rebuilt with new tables and chairs, lecturn, and projector.

    August 19, 2014
  • A student employee noted that the welding equipment was out-of-date and what happened.

    July 24, 2014
  • Another 3D printer that uses different materials.

    June 27, 2014