Engineering Featured at Washington DC Hawkeye Caucus

Thursday, November 14, 2013

Five College of Engineering representatives participated in the November 13 Hawkeye Caucus at the US Capitol in Washington DC.

The event gave University of Iowa President Sally Mason, deans, student leaders, and even Herky a chance to meet with congressional representatives and alumni, and showcase the best the UI has to offer Iowa and the nation.

Representing the College of Engineering were Alec Scranton, dean; Milan Sonka, professor and departmental executive officer of electrical and computer engineering and director of the Iowa Institute for Biomedical Imaging; Er-Wei Bai, professor of electrical and computer engineering and researcher at the Center for Computer-Aided Design and the Iowa Institute for Biomedical Imaging; Ibrahim Ozbolat, assistant professor of mechanical and industrial engineering and co-director of the Advanced Manufacturing Technology Group; and Tim Marler, associate research scientist at the Center for Computer-Aided Design, an adjunct associate professor of biomedical engineering and mechanical and industrial engineering, senior research scientist with the Virtual Soldier Research program; and co-director of the Advanced Manufacturing Technology Group.  Members also conducted individual meetings with federal agencies and departments.

The Hawkeye Caucus came on the heels of Mason's visit to the White House Tuesday, when she and five other university presidents met with Gene B.Sperling, assistant to the president on economic policy, to discuss strategies for helping more students from low-income families attend college.

In addition to hosting 275 guests for a reception Wednesday as part of the Hawkeye Caucus event, college representatives set up tables in the Cannon House Office Building near the U.S. Capitol to provide information about their programs, public engagement activities, and alumni living and working in Washington.

The UI is also a hub of education and discovery and relies on federal research funding from agencies like the National Institutes for Health, the National Science Foundation, and the National Endowment for the Humanities to seek cures for cancer, unlock the mysteries of the brain, and develop solutions relevant to the nation—and world—economy.