E/WEEK

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E/WEEK
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News about
The University of Iowa College of Engineering
Week of September 25, 2016
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E/WEEK College Staff:
Editor:  Wendy Brentner, director, alumni relations and communications
Contributing Writer: Andrea Zeek, UI Communication
College Web Site:  www.engineering.uiowa.edu
E/WEEK Archives:  http://list.uiowa.edu/archives/eweek.html
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IN THIS EDITION:

1. Engineering Gets Set for Homecoming Week with Two Major Activities
2. 2016 ASCE Corn Monument Makes Debut
3. Cedar Rapids Gazette: Iowa Flood Center--This is a high-adrenaline moment for us'
4. Wang Research Featured on ScienceNode about Climate Change and Feelings
5. Iowa Informatics Initiative to Hold September 27 Open House
6. Daily Iowan: Grant to Aid University of Iowa Water Program
7. Engineering Library Opens New Creative Space
8. Grants and Contracts
9. College Events for the Coming Weeks
10. About E/WEEK

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1. Engineering Gets Set for Homecoming Week with Two Major Activities

The College of Engineering is kicking off Homecoming Week with two big activities.

On Friday, September 30, it will host the Party After the Parade from 6:30-8:30 p.m. in the Student Commons. Student organizations will be managing game booths in the Commons and the third floor atrium.  Herky and members of the Hawkeye Marching Band will stop by after the pep rally to play a rousing rendition of the Iowa fight song.

On Saturday, October 1, the Homecoming Tailgate Open House will take place from 8:30-10:30 a.m. in the Student Commons. A pancake breakfast will be served before heading to Kinnick Stadium for a Hawkeye win.

RSVP for the Party after the Parade and/or Homecoming Tailgate Breakfast at https://uiowa.qualtrics.com/SE/?SID=SV_02NuEJnAmSAu3pb.

2. 2016 ASCE Corn Monument Makes Debut

In the third year of the corn monument revival, University of Iowa engineering students ramped up their efforts with the tallest, largest, and most ambitious design on record.

This year’s monument was erected Sept. 26 on the west side of the Pentacrest in the shape of a pyramid with a football mounted on top. It was designed last fall by engineering students Taryn Gholson and Marri VanDyke, who were inspired by the NFL’s Vince Lombardi Trophy. Made with about 3,000 ears of corn, the monument stands 26 feet, 7.5 inches tall and weighs more than 4,500 pounds.
A UI Homecoming tradition, the corn monument dates back to 1919. The tradition continued annually until the 1960s, when interest waned. It was revived in 1981 and made sporadic appearances since—until 2014, when the UI student chapter of the American Society of Civil Engineers took up the project and built a 25-foot monument using about 1,100 ears of corn.

“The monument is really cool because it was a tradition for so long to unite campus,” says Travis Thornburgh, vice chair of the 2016 corn monument team. “It’s something very Iowa.”

It was in this spirit that Thornburgh and chair Brendan Durkin, both senior civil engineering majors, worked to include more students from the College of Engineering and across campus. From helping out with gluing, cutting, and drilling on build days to painting a mural of Herky at the base of the structure, students from a variety of disciplines volunteered their time. The mural recalls the first picture of Herky drawn by a UI alumnus in 1948. Coincidentally, the original drawing also featured Northwestern, who the Hawkeyes will play in their Homecoming game Oct. 1.

Thornburgh says it was especially important for the team to partner with the College of Engineering’s Nexus of Engineering and Art program to make a design that was both practical to build and aesthetically pleasing.

Bill Eichinger, a professor of civil engineering who helped the students design and construct the monument, says the project is a valuable learning experience for students because it’s unlike their typical coursework.

“We don’t build anything like this in the classroom,” Eichinger says. “They have to design and construct something that’s real and work through problems as they go.”

Thornburgh says working on the corn monument has given him a greater appreciation of what it takes to build a structure.

“It’s been a great experience,” he says. “As engineers, really going through the phases of construction gives us a lot of perspective on what we’ll be asking people to do in the future.”

The monument will remain on the Pentacrest until Oct. 3.

3. Cedar Rapids Gazette: Iowa Flood Center--This is a high-adrenaline moment for us'

The Cedar Rapids, IA, Gazette, published a major feature on the Iowa Flood Center, a unit of IIHR-Hydroscience & Engineering, as flood waters were again rising in the area, similar to the devastating 2008 flood.

To read the complete story, go to http://www.engineering.uiowa.edu/news/cedar-rapids-gazette-iowa-flood-ce....

4. Wang Research Featured on ScienceNode about Climate Change and Feelings

Jun Wang, professor of chemical and biochemical engineering and researcher at the UI Center for Global and Regional Environmental Research, and colleagues have their research on climate change and how it may affect feelings featured on ScienceNode, an online publication jointly funded by organizations in the US and Europe for experts and non-experts alike that explores the real-world impact of advanced computing and networks.

Sponsored by the US National Science Foundation (NSF), Wang and fellow researchers may have found an even more personal implication of climate change: It can hurt human feelings.

In fact, the research shows proper analysis might be able to forecast feelings days in advance. That is the potential offered by Tweether, a visualization of real-time Twitter and weather data that shows how the feelings of users can fluctuate with the weather. Tweether visualizes selected clusters of weather on a 3D map, and graphs a correlation with tweeted sentiments.

Wang joined the UI College of Engineering earlier this year. His special fields of knowledge include interaction between atmospheric composition and climate change; impacts of aerosols on air quality, weather, and climate; interdisciplinary research related to cloud and trace gases, air quality and public health, irrigation, land use, fire, agriculture and climate change, as well as renewable (solar and wind) energy, and education in Earth Science.

To read the ScienceNode article, go to https://sciencenode.org/feature/climate-change-hurting-your-feelings.php.

5. Iowa Informatics Initiative to Hold September 27 Open House

The Iowa Informatics Initiative (UI3) will hold an open house from 3:45-4:30 p.m. September 27 on the Fifth Floor, N500 of the College of Public Health Building, Iowa City, to celebrate its new facilities.

Guests will be able to tour the facility, meet members of the Informatics Initiative Cluster faculty and support teams, and learn about the design of the UI3 facility presented by the BNIM design team. The University of Iowa has transformed the fifth floor of CPHB into a new centrally located research community destination, designed with digital tools and collaborative workspaces, visualization wall, reservable rooms for project teams, and expanded technology and training facilities to stimulate campus-wide collaborations.

The Iowa Informatics Initiative is a campus-wide multidisciplinary initiative designed to provide overarching coordination of informatics activities across the institution, which span from health care to digital arts and humanities. The initiative aims to expand the research capabilities, strengthen educational and training opportunities in informatics-related areas, and provide a single point of contact for external constituents with interests in informatics.

Light Refreshments will be provided.

Twenty-nine UI3 faculty members from the College of Engineering include Ibrahim Demir, assistant professor of civil and environmental engineering; Hans Johnson, assistant professor of electrical and computer engineering; Amaury Lendasse, associate professor of mechanical and industrial engineering; Fatima Toor, assistant professor of electrical and computer engineering; Jun Wang, professor of chemical and biochemical engineering; Greg Carmichael, Karl Kammermeyer Professor of Chemical and Biochemical Engineering, co-director of the UI Center for Global and Regional Environmental Research, and director of UI3; Joe Assouline, adjunct associate professor of biomedical engineering; Terry Braun, associate professor of biomedical engineering; Guadalupe Canahuate, assistant professor of electrical and computer engineering; Yong Chen, professor of mechanical and industrial engineering; Gary Christensen, professor of electrical and computer engineering; Keri Hornbuckle, professor of civil and environmental engineering and Engineering associate dean for academic programs; Mathews Jacob, associate professor of electrical and computer engineering; Witold Krajewski, Rose & Joseph Summers Chair in Water Resources Engineering professor of civil and environmental engineering, and director of the Iowa Flood Center; David Kristensen, assistant professor of biomedical engineering; Andrew Kusiak, professor of mechanical and industrial engineering; Michael Mackey, associate professor of biomedical engineering; Tim Mattes, associate professor of civil and environmental engineering; Syed Mubeen, assistant professor of chemical and biochemical engineering; Priyadarshini Pennathur, assistant professor of mechanical and industrial engineering; Joseph Reinhardt, professor of biomedical engineering; Jerry Schnoor, Allen S. Henry Chair in Engineering, professor of civil and environmental engineering, and co-director of the UI Center for Global and Regional Environmental Research; Milan Sonka; Lowell C. Battershell Chair in Biomedical Engineering, professor of electrical and computer engineering, Engineering associate dean for graduate programs and research, and co-director of the Iowa Institute for Biomedical Imaging; Charles Stanier, associate professor of chemical and biochemical engineering; Geb Thomas, professor of mechanical and industrial engineering; Gabriele Villarini, associate professor of civil and environmental engineering; Larry Weber, Edwin B. Green Chair in Hydraulics, professor of civil and environmental engineering, and director of IIHR--Hydroscience & Engineering; Xiaodong Wu, professor of electrical and computer engineering; and Ahmed Dogan, adjunct professor of chemical and biochemical engineering.

For more information, contact Andrea Flaherty at andrea-flaherty@uiowa.edu.

6. Daily Iowan: Grant to Aid University of Iowa Water Program

A new program for graduate students that focuses heavily on water will roll into campus next year.

The National Science Foundation Research Traineeship has awarded the University of Iowa a $3 million grant to start the Sustainable Water Development program.

7. Engineering Library Opens New Creative Space

To watch the video on YouTube, go to https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ebwazo6Ov44.

University of Iowa students have a new resource to explore the latest in virtual reality, 3-D scanning and modeling, and wearable technology.

In collaboration with the UI College of Engineering, the Lichtenberger Engineering Library has opened a Creative Space on the second floor of the Seamans Center (2001C). The newly renovated room in the library includes tinkering stations featuring different technologies and tools, as well as collaborative work areas with white boards and computer monitors that can split into as many as four independent screens.

Engineering Librarian Kari Kozak says the new space was designed to spark the imaginations of students, faculty, and staff and to help them turn their ideas into reality.

“It’s great that we now have a dedicated Creative Space where people will be able to imagine, tinker, design, and—ultimately—create new and innovative projects,” Kozak says. “I can’t wait to see what they’ll do with all of the new tools.”

The Creative Space’s virtual reality station is equipped with a powerful computer and video card that allow for hours of virtual reality creation and display. Students can check out 360-degree 3-D cameras; Leap Motion controllers, which sense the movement of your hands and display them in 3-D; and a headset called an Oculus Rift, which students can use to experience virtual reality environments.

The Creative Space features four types of 3-D scanners, including the Xbox Kinect, which has a scanning range starting at 48 inches. After objects are scanned, they can be sent to the Engineering Electronics Shop or the Engineering Machine Shop to be printed in 3-D. The most affordable 3-D printer is the MakerBot, at a rate of 20 cents per gram for UI faculty, staff, and students. It would cost about $18 to print a coffee mug that is 4 inches tall and 4 inches in diameter.

Don’t know what you want to create? That’s OK. Kozak also has designed a variety of “creative boxes” tailored to different interests, such as e-textiles, programming and hardware, and motorized robotics. One box includes the MaKey MaKey, a tool with which you can turn anything into a keyboard by connecting alligator clips to your desired touchpoints. For example, you could turn bananas into the keys of a piano.

Caleb Mann, a first-year biomedical engineering student, says he thinks the Creative Space will make it easier for him to experiment with new concepts in engineering.

“I feel like the encouragement of ideas is really helpful,” Mann says. “I’m really excited to brainstorm.”

The Creative Space is open during the Engineering Library’s regular hours. Visitors should work with library staff to check out different tools in the space.

8. Grants and Contracts

Jun Wang, professor of chemical and biochemical engineering and researcher at the UI Center for Global and Regional Environmental Research, received a $102,870 grant from the University of California, Riverside, for studying accelerated nitrogen cycling and trace gas emissions in high temperature agroecosystems.

Mona Garvin, assistant professor of electrical and computer engineering, received a $62,670 grant from the US Department of Veterans Affairs, Iowa City Veterans Affairs Medical Center, to study visual sensory impairments.

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9. College Events for the Coming Weeks

September 27 – Procter & Gamble Information Session, 5:00 p.m., 3124 Seamans Center.

September 29 – Pariveda Solutions Lunch and Learn, 11:30 a.m., 3124 Seamans Center.

September 29 – Mechanical Engineering Graduate Seminar, 3:30 p.m., 2217 Seamans Center. "Marine Propellers," presented by Thad Michael, of the Naval Surface Warfare Center (NSWC), Carderock Division.

September 29 – Chemical and Biochemical Engineering Professional Seminar, 5:00 p.m., 1505 Seamans Center.

September 30 -- College of Engineering Party After the Parade, 6:30 p.m., Student Commons, Seamans Center.

October 1 – College of Engineering Homecoming Tailgate Open House, 8:30-10:30 a.m., Student Commons, Seamans Center.

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10. About E/WEEK

E/WEEK is a weekly electronic newsletter to inform faculty, staff, and students about important news and events of The University of Iowa College of Engineering.

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