Chairs and Professorships

Jasbir Arora

The Miller Faculty Development Fund was made possible by the generosity of F. Wendell Miller, who left his entire estate jointly to The University of Iowa and Iowa State University. Mr. Miller, who died in 1995 at age 97, was born in Altoona, Illinois, grew up in Rockwell City, Iowa, graduated from Grinnell College and Harvard Law School, and practiced law in Des Moines and Chicago before returning to Rockwell City to manage his family's farm holdings and to practice law.

His bequest helped to establish the F. Wendell Miller Trust, the annual earnings which, in part, help support faculty development proposals that advance the university's strategic plan. Up to $250,000 is available for allocation each year. Faculty members who receive awards will be designated as F. Wendell Miller Professors for the academic year of their award. Individual fellowships can vary from $1000 to $25,000, depending on the nature of the proposed initiative.

The F. Wendell Miller Professorships provide faculty with opportunities to enhance their scholarly work in the undergraduate academic programs of the University and to provide innovative approaches designed to enhance student learning through assessing and improving the quality of curriculum and its delivery.

Christoph Beckermann

University of Iowa Foundation Distinguished Professor of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering

Gregory Carmichael

The Karl Kammermeyer Endowed Professorship in Chemical and Biochemical Engineering was established in 2001 through resources provided by a combination of private gifts and funds from The University of Iowa Department of Chemical and Biochemical Engineering. Dr. John Kammermeyer, an Iowa City area allergist and son of the late Karl Kammermeyer, made a significant contribution to help fund the professorship in honor of his father. Additional private support was also provided by the following chemical and biochemical engineering alumni who were mentored by Dr. Kammermeyer--William Liike, William Lichtenberger, and Richard Dunlavey.

Born in 1904 in Nuremberg, Germany, Karl Kammermeyer attended the Technical University of Munich until 1925, when he emigrated to the U.S. Shortly after arriving here, he began working as a mechanic's helper at the Fisher Body plant in Detroit. At the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor, he earned bachelor's degrees in chemical engineering and mathematics in 1930 and a doctorate of science degree in chemical engineering in 1932. For the next 17 years, Dr. Kammermeyer worked as a chemist in the private sector at Pure Oil Company, Publicker Industries, and the Glenn L. Martin Company, which sparked a lifelong fascination with the nature of differential diffusion across plastic membranes.

At The University of Iowa, Dr. Kammermeyer applied his knowledge of plastic membranes to help perfect the artificial kidney and a prototype heart-lung machine. A gifted teacher, Dr. Kammermeyer helped launch many careers by collaborating with students on research until his death in 1999.

Thomas L. Casavant

Roy J. Carver, Jr., is the son of Lucille A. Carver and the late Roy J. Carver, Sr.

Mr. Carver is chairman of the board of directors, Carver Pump Company, Muscatine, IA, a builder of centrifugal pumps.

He also is president of Carver Aero, Inc., which operates fixed base operations at airports in Muscatine and Davenport, IA; Carver Hardware, Inc., which operates a chain of retail hardware stores; Harrington Signal, Inc., a fast-growing fire alarm equipment manufacturing, distributing, and electronic contract manufacturing company; River Front Real Estate, Inc.; Waterpark Entertainment Ltd.; and K.C. Investments. In addition, he is a director of Bandag, Incorporated, Founded by Mr. Carver’s father, Bandag revolutionized the tire retreading industry by introducing a cold "precured" process designed to produce durable retreads from used truck tire casings.

Mr. Carver also is a director of Iowa First Bancshares Corp, and chairman of the board of the Roy J. Carver Charitable Trust, which supports biomedical and scientific research, scholarships, and programs addressing the educational and recreational needs of youth.

Mr. Carver received a BA degree in mathematics in 1966 and an MS degree in statistics and actuarial science in 1968 from The University of Iowa. In 1970, he earned an MBA degree from the University of California at Berkeley.

Kyung K. Choi

The University of Iowa College of Engineering has established an endowed faculty position with the creation of the William D. Ashton Professorship in Civil Engineering.  The professorship honors UI engineering graduate William Ashton of Davenport, Iowa.  The professorship is supported by the Ashton Professorships Fund at the UI Foundation, which was created by a recent major gift commitment from the Ashton Family Foundation in Dallas, Texas.

Ashton received Bachelor of Science and Master of Science degrees in civil engineering from the UI in 1962 and 1963, respectively.  He founded Ashton Engineering Inc. in Davenport, Iowa, in 1982, and he is a member of the college's Distinguished Engineering Alumni Academy. 

After graduating from the UI, Ashton served as chief of the Structural Design Section, Rock Island Corps of Engineers, and in 1970 earned the title of Quad City Engineer of the Year for his work on the 2,600-foot Milwaukee Railroad Bridge over Saylorville Reservoir.  He has traveled throughout the United States as well as abroad to India, Ghana and other countries on many water-related projects.  He received the U.S. Department of the Army Meritorious Civilian Service Award in 1974 and the Army Certificate of Appreciation in 1978.  His extensive community service includes the Rotary Club of Davenport, where he served as board member and president and led service trips to India for National Immunization Day against polio and to Guatemala to design rainwater capture systems. 

In 2004 Ashton and his brother, 1964 UI engineering graduate Jim Ashton of Dallas, Texas, provided the cornerstone gift to the UI Foundation to enable construction of the Ashton Cross Country Course at the UI.  The brothers made their gift in memory of their former Hawkeye cross country coach, the late Francis X. Cretzmeyer.  William and Jim Ashton were both letter winners on the Iowa Hawkeyes cross country team, and William is a former UI Varsity Club president.

William E. Eichinger

The University of Iowa College of Engineering has established an endowed faculty position with the creation of the William D. Ashton Professorship in Civil Engineering.  The professorship honors UI engineering graduate William Ashton of Davenport, Iowa.  The professorship is supported by the Ashton Professorships Fund at the UI Foundation, which was created by a recent major gift commitment from the Ashton Family Foundation in Dallas, Texas.

Ashton received Bachelor of Science and Master of Science degrees in civil engineering from the UI in 1962 and 1963, respectively.  He founded Ashton Engineering Inc. in Davenport, Iowa, in 1982, and he is a member of the college's Distinguished Engineering Alumni Academy. 

After graduating from the UI, Ashton served as chief of the Structural Design Section, Rock Island Corps of Engineers, and in 1970 earned the title of Quad City Engineer of the Year for his work on the 2,600-foot Milwaukee Railroad Bridge over Saylorville Reservoir.  He has traveled throughout the United States as well as abroad to India, Ghana and other countries on many water-related projects.  He received the U.S. Department of the Army Meritorious Civilian Service Award in 1974 and the Army Certificate of Appreciation in 1978.  His extensive community service includes the Rotary Club of Davenport, where he served as board member and president and led service trips to India for National Immunization Day against polio and to Guatemala to design rainwater capture systems. 

In 2004 Ashton and his brother, 1964 UI engineering graduate Jim Ashton of Dallas, Texas, provided the cornerstone gift to the UI Foundation to enable construction of the Ashton Cross Country Course at the UI.  The brothers made their gift in memory of their former Hawkeye cross country coach, the late Francis X. Cretzmeyer.  William and Jim Ashton were both letter winners on the Iowa Hawkeyes cross country team, and William is a former UI Varsity Club president.

C. Allan Guymon

The endowed professorship is named after Engineering alumna Sharon Tinker (BSE 1980 chemical engineering) of Houston, TX, process safety engineer in the ExxonMobil Research and Engineering Company in Baytown, Texas

After graduation from the University of Iowa, she joined the Exxon Chemical Company and worked in technical and management positions in chemical plants and refineries in Texas, California, Louisiana, and Singapore.

Ms. Tinker has been recognized for her contributions with a Young Engineer of the Year Award from the Texas Society of Professional Engineers, an ExxonMobil Chemical Responsible Care Award, and an ExxonMobil Chemical Global Manufacturing Excellence Award.  In the past she has served on the United Way of the Baytown Area Board of Directors in Baytown, Texas, the Torrance Education Foundation Board of Directors in Torrance, California, and the University of Iowa College of Engineering Chemical and Biochemical Department Advisory Board.

Ms. Tinker is currently a member of the Safety and Chemical Engineering Education (SACHE) Committee of the American Institute of Chemical Engineers (AIChE) and the UI College of Engineering Campaign Task Force.  She continues to be a member of the Ameican Institute of Chemical Engineers (AIChE) and the Society of Women Engineers (SWE).

Keri Hornbuckle

The Donald E. Bently Professorship in Engineering was established in June 2002 through a gift to the University of Iowa Foundation from University of Iowa engineering graduate Donald E. Bently of Minden, NV.

The Donald E. Bently Engineering Fund establishes a permanent endowment with the annual spendable earnings used to support the College’s academic and research pursuits.

A globally recognized authority on rotor dynamics as well as vibration monitoring and diagnostics, Mr. Bently was born in Pleasant Prairie, IA. He graduated from the UI in 1949 with a B.S. degree with distinction, and in 1950 with an M.S. degree, both in electrical engineering, from the UI College of Engineering. Working from his garage as a graduate student, Mr. Bently pioneered and perfected a transistorized design for a new type of distance-measuring device. His transducer soon found its application inside machinery where it was used to observe the vibration and position characteristics that are important indicators of machinery condition.

He was founder and former owner, Chief Executive Officer, and Chairman of the Board of Bently Nevada Corporation (BNC), a $200 million per year manufacturer of electronic systems for monitoring the mechanical condition of machinery. He was also the former President of Bently Rotor Dynamics Research Corporation (BRDRC), a subsidiary of Bently Nevada Corporation. Mr. Bently sold BNC and BRDRC (as a sale of assets) to General Electric Corporation in a friendly acquisition in 2002. Until his death in 2012, Mr. Bently was the owner, Chairman of the Board, and Chief Executive Officer of Bently Pressurized Bearing Company, which manufactures modern, highly efficient bearings that control stability for rotating machinery. He also was the owner of Bently Agrowdynamics – the agricultural business of the Bently Family Limited Partnership, of which he is general partner.

Mr. Bently authored or co-authored more than 140 papers on rotor dynamics and was the holder of two patents. In 2002, he was recognized as a Fellow by the American Society of Mechanical Engineers.

Mr. Bently was Chairman of the International Symposium on Stability Control of Rotating Machinery (ISCORMA-2), held in 2003 in Gdansk, Poland. Mr. Bently’s book, titled Fundamentals of Rotating Machinery Diagnostics, was released in 2002.

Witold F. Krajewski

The Rose & Joseph Summers Chair in Water Resources Engineering was established through a gift to the University of Iowa Foundation from University of Iowa engineering graduate Joseph B. Summers of Hanford, CA, in honor of his wife, Rose. Based in the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineeering, the Summers’ gift enables the College to further strengthen its internationally renowned programs in water resources engineering.

Until his death in 2006, Mr. Summers was chairman of the board of Summers Engineering Inc., which he founded in 1962. An active consulting engineer, he was a leader in water use, irrigation, and drainage issues in California and internationally. He made a profound impact on water conservation and preservation in the water-starved U.S. West. Among many honors, Mr. Summers received the inaugural Merriam Improved Irrigation Award from the U.S. Committee on Irrigation and Drainage in 1999.

A member of the College’s Distinguished Engineering Alumni Academy, Mr. Summers received his bachelor’s degree in civil engineering from The University of Iowa in 1948. He served as a member of the UI Engineering Building Campaign Steering Committee for the Seamans Center for the Engineering Arts and Sciences and served as a member of the Engineering Advisory Board and Development Council.

Mr. Summers was a recipient of The University of Iowa Alumni Association Distinguished Alumni Award for Service.

Anton Kruger

The Donald E. Bently Faculty Fellowship in Engineering was established in June 2002 through a gift to the University of Iowa Foundation from University of Iowa engineering graduate Donald E. Bently of Minden, NV.

The Donald E. Bently Engineering Fund establishes a permanent endowment with the annual spendable earnings used to support the College’s academic and research pursuits.

A globally recognized authority on rotor dynamics as well as vibration monitoring and diagnostics, Mr. Bently was born in Pleasant Prairie, IA. He graduated from the UI in 1949 with a B.S. degree with distinction, and in 1950 with an M.S. degree, both in electrical engineering, from the UI College of Engineering. Working from his garage as a graduate student, Mr. Bently pioneered and perfected a transistorized design for a new type of distance-measuring device. His transducer soon found its application inside machinery where it was used to observe the vibration and position characteristics that are important indicators of machinery condition.

He was founder and former owner, Chief Executive Officer, and Chairman of the Board of Bently Nevada Corporation (BNC), a $200 million per year manufacturer of electronic systems for monitoring the mechanical condition of machinery. He is also the former President of Bently Rotor Dynamics Research Corporation (BRDRC), a subsidiary of Bently Nevada Corporation. Mr. Bently sold BNC and BRDRC (as a sale of assets) to General Electric Corporation in a friendly acquisition in 2002. Until his death in 2012, Mr. Bently was the owner, Chairman of the Board, and Chief Executive Officer of Bently Pressurized Bearing Company, which manufactures modern, highly efficient bearings that control stability for rotating machinery. He also was the owner of Bently Agrowdynamics – the agricultural business of the Bently Family Limited Partnership, of which he was general partner.

Mr. Bently authored or co-authored more than 140 papers on rotor dynamics and was the holder of two patents. In 2002, he was recognized as a Fellow by the American Society of Mechanical Engineers.

Mr. Bently was Chairman of the International Symposium on Stability Control of Rotating Machinery (ISCORMA-2), held in 2003 in Gdansk, Poland. Mr. Bently’s book, titled Fundamentals of Rotating Machinery Diagnostics, was released in 2002.

Pavlo Krokhmal

The Donald E. Bently Faculty Fellowship in Engineering was established in June 2002 through a gift to the University of Iowa Foundation from University of Iowa engineering graduate Donald E. Bently of Minden, NV.

The Donald E. Bently Engineering Fund establishes a permanent endowment with the annual spendable earnings used to support the College’s academic and research pursuits.

A globally recognized authority on rotor dynamics as well as vibration monitoring and diagnostics, Mr. Bently was born in Pleasant Prairie, IA. He graduated from the UI in 1949 with a B.S. degree with distinction, and in 1950 with an M.S. degree, both in electrical engineering, from the UI College of Engineering. Working from his garage as a graduate student, Mr. Bently pioneered and perfected a transistorized design for a new type of distance-measuring device. His transducer soon found its application inside machinery where it was used to observe the vibration and position characteristics that are important indicators of machinery condition.

He was founder and former owner, Chief Executive Officer, and Chairman of the Board of Bently Nevada Corporation (BNC), a $200 million per year manufacturer of electronic systems for monitoring the mechanical condition of machinery. He is also the former President of Bently Rotor Dynamics Research Corporation (BRDRC), a subsidiary of Bently Nevada Corporation. Mr. Bently sold BNC and BRDRC (as a sale of assets) to General Electric Corporation in a friendly acquisition in 2002. Until his death in 2012, Mr. Bently was the owner, Chairman of the Board, and Chief Executive Officer of Bently Pressurized Bearing Company, which manufactures modern, highly efficient bearings that control stability for rotating machinery. He also was the owner of Bently Agrowdynamics – the agricultural business of the Bently Family Limited Partnership, of which he was general partner.

Mr. Bently authored or co-authored more than 140 papers on rotor dynamics and was the holder of two patents. In 2002, he was recognized as a Fellow by the American Society of Mechanical Engineers.

Mr. Bently was Chairman of the International Symposium on Stability Control of Rotating Machinery (ISCORMA-2), held in 2003 in Gdansk, Poland. Mr. Bently’s book, titled Fundamentals of Rotating Machinery Diagnostics, was released in 2002.

Sudhakar M. Reddy

University of Iowa Foundation Distinguished Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering

Madhavan Raghavan

The Robert and Virginia Wheeler Faculty Fellowship in Engineering was established in 2003 through a gift to The University of Iowa Foundation from the estate of Robert Wheeler, a graduate of the College of Engineering, and his wife, Virginia. The Robert and Virginia Faculty Fellowship Fund establishes a permanent endowment with annual spendable earnings used to support the College's academic and research pursuits.

Robert Wheeler was born in New York in 1922. He graduated from The University of Iowa, earning a BS degree in 1948, an MS degree in 1949, and a PhD degree in 1958 -- all in civil engineering. He was among the first to earn a doctorate in civil engineering at the University.
From 1953-1958, Dr. Wheeler was an instructor in civil engineering and served as assistant professor from 1958-1961. He also taught at Macalester College, Michigan Technical University, and the University of Akron. He retired from the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering at the University of Missouri-Columbia. During his career, he also was a land developer in Denver, Colorado, and helped design emergency medical transportation systems in New York and Missouri.
Dr. Wheeler served in the U. S. Army and was a member of the Veterans of Foreign Wars of the U.S.
Virginia R. Wheeler, a native of Sioux County, Iowa, married Dr. Wheeler in 1946 in Iowa City. She served as a supervisor for the Brown Shoe Company, St. Louis.

Michelle Scherer

Donald E. Bently Professor of Engineering

Jerald L. Schnoor

The Allen S. Henry Chair in Engineering was established in May 2001 through a generous gift to the University of Iowa Foundation from University of Iowa engineering graduate Allen S. Henry of Melbourne, FL. His gift supports a faculty member who has a distinguished academic and research program for a five-year renewable period.

Dr. Henry is retired vice president-general manager of JDS Uniphase Broadband Products. From 1996 to 1999, he was chairman, chief executive officer, and president of Broadband Communications Products prior to its acquisition by Uniphase Corporation. In 1996, Dr. Henry retired as president of the Electronic Systems Sector of Harris Corporation, Melbourne, FL, after 23 years of service.

A member of the College's Distinguished Engineering Alumni Academy, Dr. Henry received his master's and doctoral degrees in mechanics and hydraulics from The University of Iowa in 1968 and 1971, respectively. He has served as a member of The University of Iowa Engineering Building Campaign Steering Committee, as well as the College of Engineering Advisory Board and Development Council.

Dr. Henry has served as chairman of the board of Holmes Regional Medical Center, a 468-bed community hospital. He also serves as board secretary of Health First, an integrated healthcare delivery system in Melbourne, FL. In his role as trustee for Florida Institute of Technology, he has endowed a faculty chair in optical communications. He also was the major benefactor for the Women's Center Capital Campaign. The Women's Center aids more than 10,000 women annually in coping with life problems.

Alec B. Scranton

UI Foundation Distinguished Professorship in Chemical and Biochemical Engineering

Milan Sonka

Lowell G. Battershell Professor and Chair Biomedical Engineering

Frederick Stern

Engineering alumnus Dr. George D. Ashton is an international expert on the study of ice jams, ice control, flooding, snow drifting, snow loads, and river ice. Now a resident of New Hampshire, Ashton was born in Davenport, Iowa in 1939, received a BSCE degree in civil engineering from the University of Iowa in 1961 an MSCE in civil engineering from the University of Arizona, Tucson, Arizona in 1963, and a PhD in mechanics and hydraulics from the University of Iowa, in 1971. From 1962 to 1964 he was a Lieutenant in the U.S. Army. From 1964 to 1967 he worked as a Structural Engineer for Bechtel Co. in San Francisco. After earning his PhD, he joined the U.S. Army Cold Regions Research and Engineering Laboratory (CRREL) in Hanover, New Hampshire and held various research and management positions with his research concentrating on river ice processes and problems. From 1990 to 1998, he was Chief Research and Engineering Directorate. He retired in 1998 and now works as a private consultant in Lebanon, New Hampshire, dealing primarily with river ice problems. Ashton has received the Straub Medal from the University of Minnesota, the Hilgard prize from ASCE, the Stevens Award from ASCE and most recently the 2002 Ice Research and Engineering Award by the International Association for Hydraulic Research. He is the author of numerous papers and book chapters dealing with ice problems. He was Editor of the Journal of Cold Regions Science and Technology from 1995 to 2006.

Larry J. Weber

The Edwin B. Green Chair in Hydraulics honors University of Iowa alumnus Edwin Green.  The Chair is supported by income from the permanent Edwin B. Green Endowment Fund.  Although he received his B.A. in journalism in 1929, Mr. Green was a long-time supporter of the arts, the medical community, and his own field, journalism.  His generosity also has impacted UI endowed professorships and fellowships, University Libraries, Iowa Hall in the Museum of Natural History, and scholarships to help school children attend educational and recreational programs and summer camps.

During his time at Iowa, Mr. Green worked as an editorial and advertising staff member of The Daily Iowan.  After graduating from the UI, he joined The Iowa City Press-Citizen, later serving as managing editor for 32 years until his retirement in 1966.

Over the years, before his death in 1988, Mr. Green was an exceptional friend of the UI Museum of Art.  On many occasions he lent works from his collection of Grant Wood’s art.  He also helped the museum acquire several important pieces, including Eugene Berman’s L’Orage, Emerson Woelffer’s Max Ernst, Ulfert Wilke’s Red Was the Beginning, and James Rosenquist’s Off the Continental Divide.  In 1985, he made an outright donation of Sketch for Herbert Hoover’s Birthplace, which has been called one of the most important Wood drawings in existence.  Also, through his efforts, the Wood painting Plaid Sweater was donated to the University.

Mr. Green’s generosity also extended to the UI Department of Internal Medicine and Cardiovascular Research Center, along with the Lewis E. January Learning Resources Unit and the School of Journalism.  He helped in a campaign to establish a distinguished lectureship series in tribute to long-time School of Journalism director Les Moeller.

Olesya Zhupanska

The Robert and Virginia Wheeler Faculty Fellowship in Engineering was established in 2003 through a gift to The University of Iowa Foundation from the estate of Robert Wheeler, a graduate of the College of Engineering, and his wife, Virginia. The Robert and Virginia Faculty Fellowship Fund establishes a permanent endowment with annual spendable earnings used to support the College's academic and research pursuits.

Robert Wheeler was born in New York in 1922. He graduated from The University of Iowa, earning a BS degree in 1948, an MS degree in 1949, and a PhD degree in 1958 -- all in civil engineering. He was among the first to earn a doctorate in civil engineering at the University.
From 1953-1958, Dr. Wheeler was an instructor in civil engineering and served as assistant professor from 1958-1961. He also taught at Macalester College, Michigan Technical University, and the University of Akron. He retired from the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering at the University of Missouri-Columbia. During his career, he also was a land developer in Denver, Colorado, and helped design emergency medical transportation systems in New York and Missouri.
Dr. Wheeler served in the U. S. Army and was a member of the Veterans of Foreign Wars of the U.S.
Virginia R. Wheeler, a native of Sioux County, Iowa, married Dr. Wheeler in 1946 in Iowa City. She served as a supervisor for the Brown Shoe Company, St. Louis.