Chemical and Biochemical Engineering Research Open House Presentation Schedule

Poster ID: 26

2:00 - 3:00

Aljaafari, Haydar

CBE

Grad

Biofilm Elimination via Combined Thermal and Antibiotic Treatment, self-sterilizing medical implants

Authors: Aljaafari, Haydar; Parnian, Parham;  Abdulwahhab, Nadia; Van Dyne, Jaymes;  Gu, Yuejia; Chicchelly, Hannah; Nuxoll, Eric

Bacterial biofilms colonize more than 150,000 medical implants each year in the U.S. causing patients to undergo multiple surgeries to have the  infected implants removed and replaced which cost the states more than $5,000,000,000. Biofilms are not susceptible to antibiotics which are the most common treatment for bacterial infections. We hypothesize that biofilms can be eliminated by applying localized mild thermal shock if combined with antibiotics. Successfully, we found that applying antibiotics during the thermal shock have dramatically reduced the required time and temperature to eliminate the  biofilms. This finding was validated for biofilms of three different types of bacteria.

Three-Minute Video: https://youtu.be/BKI7CHSbNnk

Presentation: aljaafari_cbe_vroh_2020.pdf

 

Poster ID: 27

2:00 - 3:00

Buck, Rachel

CBE

Grad

Fabricating Conductive Polymer Systems with Graphene Oxide for Anti-Static Coatings

Authors: Buck, Rachel Erin; Guymon, C. Allan; Mubeen, Syed

Graphene oxide (GO) is a carbon-based material that has excellent mechanical, thermal, and electrical properties.  When combined with non-conductive photopolymers, conductive thin coatings can be rapidly manufactured and applied to various devices to protect them and improve their capabilities, performance, and lifetime.  This project investigates how the addition of GO effects the physical, mechanical, and electrical properties of thin film composites.  Current results show that the addition of GO reduces the overall conversion of the polymer matrix but does significantly affect the mechanical properties.  However, a strong trend has been shown between increased GO concentration and increased conductivity of the films.

Three-Minute Video: https://youtu.be/mHhF8NgkjZM

Presentation:  roh_buck_go_anti-static_coatings.pdf

 

Poster ID: 28

9:00 - 10:00

Christiansen, Megan

CBE

Grad

The Lake Michigan Ozone Study (LMOS 2017) field campaign and resulting ozone control strategy

Authors: Christiansen,Megan; Abdi-Oskouei,Maryam; Stanier,Charles; Doak,Austin; Carmichael,Gregory; Pierce,Bradley; Bertram,Timothy; Stone,Elizabeth; Roozitalab, Behrooz; Hughes,Dagen; Ferrada,Gonzalo

A summertime campaign (LMOS 2017) studied the emission, production, and transport of key air pollutants to ozone chemistry around Lake Michigan. Chemical modeling of the campaign had an acceptable performance for overall daytime ozone but failed to simulate many of the peak concentrations, due to meteorological and chemical errors. Back trajectory analysis indicated differing source regions for both ground sites, Sheboygan, WI, and Zion, IL. The modeled sensitivity of ozone production to perturbations in hydrocarbons and nitrogen dioxides, by tracking individual reaction rates, will be discussed.

Three-Minute Video: https://youtu.be/sLmKNF2mOWM

Presentation: christiansen_cgrer_vroh_2020.pdf

 

Poster ID: 29

10:00 - 11:00

Doak, Austin

CBE

Undergrad

Characterization of ground-based atmospheric pollution and meteorology sampling stations during the Lake Michigan Ozone Study 2017

Authors: Doak, Austin; Christiansen, Megan; Alwe, Hariprasad; Bertram, Timothy; Carmichael, Gregory; Cleary, Patricia; Czarnetzki, Alan; Dickens, Angela; Janssen, Mark; Kenski, Donna; Millet, Dylan; Novak, Gordon; Pierce, Bradley; Stone, Elizabeth; Szykman, James;

The Lake Michigan Ozone Study 2017 (LMOS 2017) was a month-long campaign during the summer of 2017 which researched the transport, emissions, and chemical evolution related to ozone air pollution in the Lake Michigan airshed. Zion, Illinois and Sheboygan, Wisconsin were chosen as ground-based sampling sites for intercepting photochemically aged plumes with elevated ozone concentrations along the Lake Michigan shore. Meteorological and pollutant measurements, continuous emission monitor data from large point sources, back trajectories, and positive matrix factorization analysis were used to characterize these sites, the types of airmasses that impact them, and the impact of local sources.

Three-Minute Video: https://youtu.be/AH0Ifk1eLoc

Presentation: doak_cgrer_vroh_2020.pdf

 

Poster ID: 30

11:00 - 12:00

Fang, Huayang

CBE

Grad

Directed Network Structure Through Controlled Radical Photopolymerization

Authors: Huayang Fang

Photopolymerization is regarded as an environmentally friendly technique in terms of reduced waste, lower reaction temperature and higher productivity with low energy costs. However, drawbacks, including shrinkage and shrinkage stress during polymerization have limited the expansion of photopolymer materials for applications requiring enhanced strength and toughness. In this work, we study the effects of controlling photopolymerization in photocurable acrylate resins using a reversible-addition fragmentation chain-transfer (RAFT) agent. When polymerizing with RAFT agent, the obtained networks exhibit different thermomechanical behaviors, such as altered glassy transition temperature. Mechanical properties of photocured materials are also greatly changed with doubled tensile toughness.

Three-Minute Video: https://youtu.be/Xg3MTUgsb6I

Presentation: fang_cbe_vroh_2020.pdf

 

Poster ID: 31

1:00 - 2:00

Grover, Tanner

CBE

Grad

Improving Photocured 3D Systems Through Reaction Kinetics and Polymer Network Interactions

Authors: Grover, Tanner

Stereolithography is an additive manufacturing technique that utilizes photopolymerizable resins to produce 3D prints. Acrylic resins are commonly used because of their fast reaction kinetics enabling rapid print speeds but often produce brittle and weak materials due to chemical composition and polymerization mechanism. Conversely, cyclic ether polymerizations use a different mechanism that can produce tougher materials but suffer from slow kinetics. In this work, we combined the orthogonal polymerizations into a hybrid printing resin that can maintain fast build speeds and allow tunable mechanical properties. Additionally, the microstructure of the material could be controlled through slight changes in monomer composition.

Three-Minute Video: https://youtu.be/Q3n4-F4sKl8

Presentation: grover_cbe_vroh_2020.pdf

 

Poster ID: 32

12:00 - 1:00

Horne, Ryan

CBE

Grad

Improving Cochlear Implant Function and Integration by Photograftable Thin Film Coatings

Authors: Ryan, Horne, Adreann Peel, Douglas Bennion, Marlan Hansen, Allan Guymon

Cochlear implants (CIs) have revolutionized the treatment of the deaf and hard of hearing, albeit with complications. To prevent these complications, we have developed photograftable thin films for CI surfaces that allow for smoother insertion surgeries and reduce the development of destructive scar tissue in the inner ear after surgery. These thin films have great potential in a variety of biomedical settings because of their durable, lubricious, and anti-fouling properties

Three-Minute Video: https://youtu.be/wE4trpCvppw

Presentation: horne_cbe_vroh_2020.pdf

 

Poster ID: 33

11:00 - 12:00

Kotsiras, Alexandros

CBE

Grad

Influence of Imidazolium Ionic liquid and Light Intensity on Polymer Nanostructure within Lyotropic Liquid Crystalline Templates

Authors: Kotsiras, Alexandros; Whitley, John; Orozco, Esmeralda; Guymon, C. Allan

The development of polymers utilizing lyotropic liquid crystals (LLCs) templates and photopolymerization is a promising method to control nanostructure. However, this method often faces the problem of thermodynamically driven phase separation between the polymer and LLC templates that hinder control of the polymer local order. In this study, we investigate a new method to control hydrogel nanostructure using specific amounts of imidazolium ionic liquid and alternate slightly the light intensity of photopolymerization. This method allows us to control and retain the nanostructure of a polymer during polymerization and consequently develop polymers with unique properties not accessible in typical bulk materials.

Three-Minute Video: https://youtu.be/65WjMsvKq6c

Presentation: kotsiras_cbe_vroh_2020.pdf

 

Poster ID: 34

1:00 - 2:00

Parnian, Parham

CBE

Grad

Inducing dispersion from Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms via heat shocks

Authors: Parnian, Parham; Aljaafari, Haydar; Chicchelly, Hannah; Nuxoll, Eric E

Being protected with an extracellular polymeric matrix, biofilm infections are complicated to treat. However, transforming bacterial biofilms into their non-sessile form can render them susceptible to antimicrobials. In this study, we investigated the effect of applying heat shocks on dispersion of free-floating bacteria from Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms. We observed that a heat shock of 70°C for 5 min triggered a spike in effluent bacteria when a mature biofilm was in a flow cell (1 x 1 x 6 inches) submerged in a constant flow of diluted media at room temperature.

Three-Minute Video: https://youtu.be/Bxn8D-lN1b8

Presentation: parnian_cbe_vroh_2020.pdf

 

Poster ID: 35

9:00 - 10:00

Peel, Adreann

CBE

Grad

Development of Durable Zwitterionic Hydrogel Coatings for Antifouling of Cochlear Implants

Authors: Peel, Adreann; Horne, Ryan; Hansen, Marlan; Guymon, Allan

Zwitterionic hydrogels were examined to find balance between antifouling and durability.  Compressive modulus, swelling, and coefficient of friction were quantified as a function of crosslink density for hydrogels formed with one of two zwitterionic monomers, sulfobetaine methacrylate (SBMA) or carboxybetaine methacrylate (CBMA).  Greater amounts of crosslinker led to a higher compressive modulus but also increased swelling and coefficient of friction.  In conjunction with biological testing to determine antifouling over the crosslink density range, the balance of antifouling with mechanical properties is understood enabling formation of durable, effective antifouling zwitterionic hydrogel layers.

Three-Minute Video: https://youtu.be/cxt0SILMVxg

Presentation: peel_cbe_vroh_2020.pdf

 

Poster ID: 36

9:00 - 10:00

Smith, Riannon

CBE

Grad

Sprayable Hydrogels for Antibiotic Delivery to Burn Wounds

Authors: Smith, Riannon; Brogden, Nicole; Fiegel, Jennifer

The goal of this project is to develop thermoreversible, sprayable, antimicrobial hydrogels to treat burn wound infections while limiting painful physical contact during application. Pluronic F127, hyaluronic acid, and broad-spectrum antibiotics were combined in aqueous solution under cold conditions. Hydrogels formed with 17-20% Pluronic gelled within the desired temperature range, avoiding gelation during spraying while allowing gelation at skin temperature. Changes in spray pattern were observed based on choice of nozzle and gel viscosity, which could enable coverage of wounds of various shapes and sizes. Drug release was prolonged by increasing the Pluronic concentration, allowing tuning of dose delivered.

Three-Minute Video: https://youtu.be/DYuUW9iQRRk

Presentation: smith_cbe_vroh_2020.pdf

 

Poster ID: 37

10:00 - 11:00

Tang, Beiming

CBE

Grad

On the relative importance of local vs. long-range transport air pollutants

Authors: Beiming Tang, Charles Stanier, Meng Gao, Pablo Saide, Gregory Carmichael

East Asia Counties have experienced severe air pollution problems in the past decades. The economic success and increasing awareness urge governors to publish more strict air pollution regulations.

We applied contemporary chemical transport model WRF-Chem to study to generation and transport mechanisms of air pollutants. Quantitative evaluations with acceptable benchmarks are used to assure model accuracy against observation data collected during KORUS-AQ (Korea US air quality study) field campaign. Trajectory analysis, local emission perturbation run, and correlation analysis are adopted to determine the impact of local and remote sources on Seoul air quality. A multi-pollutant mitigation strategy is proposed based on our current understanding.

Our result confirms pollution transfer from Mongolia and Shandong peninsula to Korea, whose extent varies with time. Primary pollutants are majorly emitted from local sources, while significant amount of secondary pollutants was transferred from remote sources.

Three-Minute Video: https://youtu.be/Aq7-mObXhDY

Presentation: tang_cbe_vroh_2020.pdf

 

Poster ID: 38

1:00 - 2:00

Zoga, Paraskevi Konstantina

CBE

Grad

Substrate material effects on biofilm formation and thermal susceptibility

Authors: P. Konstantina, Zoga; Parham, Parnian; Erica B.,Ricker; Joel,Coffel; Eric, Nuxoll

Almost 4% of the medical devices implanted in the U.S annually are infected from bacterial biofilms. Although a lot of effort has been devoted on developing surfaces that would prevent the bacterial adhesion and the biofilm formation, these technologies have faced implementation or efficacy limitations. As an alternative, studies have suggested surfaces that can deliver heat to the infected area and thermally mitigate the biofilms, after their formation. Advanced functionalities like this may require specific surface materials (e.g. aluminum, polystyrene, steel).  This project investigates whether these materials noticeably encourage or discourage biofilm formation on their own.

Three-Minute Video: https://youtu.be/GL9bWZGBk6c

Presentation: zoga_paraskevi_cbe_vroh_2020.pdf